Ranching

UNR

  Western Shoshone ranchers and sisters, Carrie and Mary Dann, fought for decades with the federal government for the right to graze their cattle on ancestral lands. Although they ultimately lost, a new collection preserves the records of their long struggle.

Mary Dann passed away in 2005 and her surviving sister, Carrie, still lives near Battle Mountain on land her ancestors settled centuries ago.

Julia Ritchey

  A new mobile app launching this spring will allow ranchers and farmers to submit data on vast tracts of Nevada rangeland that currently go unmonitored. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports.

Since the Oregon standoff began, national attention has turned once again to the tension surrounding federal land management in the West, where a vast majority of land is owned by the government.

Better Forecast For Nevada Cattle Producers

Jan 5, 2016
U.S. Dept of Agriculture

The U.S. cattle market spent most of 2015 in a slump, but there’s some good news on the horizon for Nevada's ranchers in the New Year.

A few factors led 2015 to be a less-than-stellar year for the cattle market, including commodity market fluctuations, increased imports and lower demand for choice cuts of beef.

But Flint Wright of the Nevada Department of Agriculture says one of the biggest culprits has been the trend toward fattening up cows. 

University of Nevada, Reno

Out on the range, the drought means a lot of things—not having enough water to quench the thirst of your cattle or not having enough feed growing where you need it most.

And then there’s the danger of a wildfire.

All of these problems are leading many ranchers to ship their animals east. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss spoke to Bryan Masini to learn more. He owns ranches outside Yerington and Elko. 

  

Water fight takes shape in Northern Nevada

Dec 12, 2014
Chuck Schlarb

 A battle over water is brewing on the parched earth of the Black Rock Desert. An effort to transport water from Humboldt County more than 100 miles south has residents and ranchers alarmed. 

Chuck Giordano grows alfalfa on the outskirts of the Black Rock Desert in a place appropriately known as Desert Valley. But don’t let the name fool you. When it comes to water, he’s lucky.

“We have a fairly good reserve of water underneath us because our water table, even with the drought, has hardly dropped any.”