Nevada Department of Wildlife

Western Pond Turtles have been around Nevada for 150 years. Scientists say the species can be a good indicator of ecosystem health, because they use rivers, ponds and land systems.
Noah Glick

The Western Pond Turtle has been a part of the Carson Valley since at least the 1860s. Yet, scientists know very little about the population in Nevada—and what it can tell us about overall ecosystem health.

Bear Sightings Down In Nevada

Sep 21, 2016
William Andrus / CC BY 2.0

Nevada wildlife officials say fewer bears are roaming around the state's urban areas this year, likely because of weather conditions from El Nino. Our reporter Sarah Parks has more.

Coyote Sightings Up In Western Nevada

Sep 9, 2016
Kevin Bovard / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

It's the time of year when coyote pups begin venturing out to hunt on their own. This means more sightings in urban areas and a greater risk for pet owners. Reno Public Radio’s Sarah Parks has more.

From late summer through fall, coyote sightings and attacks become more common, especially during the night and early morning.

Chris Healy from the Nevada Department of Wildlife says that they have received many reports of coyote attacks on pets in western Nevada, especially on small dogs.

Nevada is in its fourth year of severe drought. Reno Public Reno’s Anh Gray reports that officials from the Nevada Department of Wildlife say that’s why they’re receiving more calls about animal sightings.

Fall is the typical time of year when wild animals are looking to put on weight for the coming winter months.

Nevada Department of Wildlife

Wildlife officials have been salvaging fish from ditches around Reno that are depleted because of the ongoing drought.

Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports that the operation saved about six thousand fish.

The Truckee Meadows Water Authority usually operates the Washoe and Verdi ditches as hydroelectric power sources, but the authority shut down all water flows to the ditches this week because of the drought.