Education

Alexa Ard

Nevada education officials have awarded grants aimed at getting 134 students through fast-track teacher training programs in time for next school year. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

The Nevada Board of Education voted last week to award more than $2.3 million in scholarship money to six institutions with what are called Alternative Routes to Licensure programs, which allow people with bachelor's degrees to transition into teaching.

The grants are part of the Teach Nevada Scholarship Program introduced by Governor Brian Sandoval.

TMCC

Leadership will soon change hands at Truckee Meadows Community College. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss has the details.

Rules Amended For State's School Choice Program

Oct 20, 2015
Julia Ritchey

  Parents waiting for funding from the state’s new Education Savings Account program got good news today. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey has the details.

Nevada Treasurer Dan Schwartz says those accounts will start receiving payments from the his department in February instead of April, pending lawmaker approval.

The state legislature passed a bill on party lines this spring creating the accounts, which allow parents to claim most of their child's state education funding to use toward private or homeschooling.

Grant Hewitt is Treasury spokesman.

Alexa Ard

Almost a thousand classrooms across Nevada do not have licensed teachers. To learn more about the state's troubling teacher shortage, and how it could affect education reforms just passed by lawmakers, Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss spoke to Trevon Milliard, the K-through-12 education reporter for the Reno Gazette-Journal. He also spent four years covering education in Southern Nevada for the Las Vegas Review Journal.

Alexa Ard

With a new leader at its helm, Sierra Nevada College is looking to grow. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports that the school specifically plans to expand its teaching licensure programs as the state's teacher shortage deepens.

Education Savings Accounts: Get The Facts, Fast!

Sep 3, 2015
Gabriella Benavidez

There's a lot of information, and confusion, surrounding Nevada's new Education Savings Account program. To get the lowdown, check out our handy infographic:

Nevada lawmakers recently passed SB302, a landmark education bill. Today, as part of our series “Nevada’s Gamble on School Choice” Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores the unforeseen consequences the new law could have on the state.

Alexa Ard

Excitement is building around Nevada’s Education Savings Account (ESA) Program, which will give eligible families about $5,000 a year to subsidize their child’s private or home school education. 

But as the application process gets underway, many parents are also voicing a lot of confusion and frustration. For the latest on the situation, Reno Public Radio’s News Director Michelle Bliss reached out to State Treasurer Dan Schwartz whose office is running the program. 

Parents Seek Clarity On Education Savings Program

Aug 21, 2015
Julia Ritchey

  Nevada Treasury officials heard from a crowd of frustrated and confused private school parents during a hearing Friday on the state's new Education Savings Account program. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey was there.

More than three dozen parents spoke during public comment to air grievances about a key provision of the new program known as the 100-day rule.

Again and again, their concerns sounded like this:

"I implore you once again to examine legislative intent with regard to the 100 days," said parent Bri Thorson.

Your Teen May Be Chronically Sleep Deprived

Aug 21, 2015
The Center for Research, Regional Education and Outreach, SUNY New Paltz Ulster County School Boards Association

 

More than 80 percent of the country’s public middle and high schools start too early, according to a report out last week from the Centers for Disease Control. Nevada's schools rank better than the average, with about half starting at 8:30 am, but that still leaves 130,000 of the state's teens chronically sleep deprived.

 

Research indicates that while younger children learn best early in the day, teens perform better if they start school later in the morning. 

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