Education

Alexa Ard

Officials with the U.S. Department of Education will release the results of a test that’s become known as the nation’s report card. The National Assessment of Educational Progress – or NAEP – is an exam given to a sampling of fourth and eighth-grade students in every state to determine how schools across the country are doing. This year, Nevada had some interesting results. Our education reporter Paul Boger spoke to Brett Barley, Nevada’s Deputy Superintendent for Student Achievement.

Jacob Solis

Students across the nation participated in a national school walkout Wednesday. The protests were aimed at pressing lawmakers to take action against gun violence in the wake of the mass shooting at a school in Florida last month that killed 17 students and teachers. Our reporter Paul Boger checked in with the students at Earl Wooster High School in Reno.

Just after 10 o'clock in the morning, at least two hundred students from Wooster High gathered in the entryway of the U.S. Post Office on Vassar Street in Reno.

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval and school leaders across the state want to bolster the number of mental health professionals as part of a plan to improve student safety.

This week, Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval sat down with a majority of the state's school superintendents to discuss ways to improve student safety. When he announced the meeting, Sandoval said he hopes the discussion will lead to recommendations that could be brought to lawmakers next year. 

Alexa Ard

 In September, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced major changes to how colleges and universities handle sexual assault. But long-term changes remain unclear, even three months after the announcement. Our news director Michelle Billman sat down with reporter Jacob Solis to sort this all out.

Alexa Ard

 

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently moved to undo an Obama-era expansion of Title IX enforcement, she left the world of higher education with a lot of questions. The old rules were meant to give more protections to victims of sexual assault on college campuses. DeVos says they go too far and deny those accused of assault due process. But at the University of Nevada, Reno, the people who work with sexual assault victims aren’t so sure.

 

 

Jacob Solis

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos moved to undo Obama-era rules for Title IX investigations at colleges and universities, it left a lot of questions. Chief among them: what standard of evidence should schools use when they investigate possible sexual assaults? Reno Public Radio’s Jacob Solis has more.

 

In 2011, the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights issued a Dear Colleague Letter that instructed colleges to use a specific standard in their investigations: preponderance of the evidence.

Governor Sandoval / Twitter

As Nevada's gubernatorial race begins to heat up, current Republican Governor Brian Sandoval says he hopes one key piece of his legacy remains intact for the next administration.

Alexa Ard

Nearly half of the public school students in Nevada's Capital City live below the poverty line, and for educators, that can present a real challenge. 

"If you think about two kids walking into any school in our school district together, one of those kids may not have had breakfast that morning -- may not have enough food going home into the weekend -- or are challenged in some other economic way. So you take that and you combine it maybe with a student who is not an English language native speaker, they're at disadvantage." 

www.ecsdnv.net

With about 10,000 students, Elko County Schools are considered a moderately sized district. However, geographically, it's among the largest public school districts in the nation, creating challenges.

At the same time, Elko also boasts one of the highest graduation rates in the Silver State.

Elko County School Superintendent Jeff Zander spoke to KUNR's Paul Boger to check in.

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