Drought

Natural Resources Conservation Service

Snowpack measurements across the Eastern Sierra and Northern Nevada are coming in higher than normal. For the latest snowpack update, let's check in with Reno Public Radio's Michelle Billman.

As a hydrologist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Jeff Anderson oversees about 100 snow telemetry sites, also called SNOTEL stations. He visited one on Mt. Rose Monday where he measured 54 inches of snow, containing almost 16 inches of water content.

Amy Westervelt

The Tahoe Basin snowpack is better right now than at any point last winter. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss has the details.

Jeff Anderson is a water supply specialist with the Nevada Snow Survey Program which regularly measures the snowpack. He says that in the past two winters, it's taken until February to reach as much snow as they're measuring now.

But that doesn't actually mean a whole lot just yet.

Courtesy Academy for the Environment at UNR

Maureen McCarthy is executive director of the Academy for the Environment at University of Nevada, Reno. Two of the Academy's most recent projects involve working closely with farmers, water districts, and tribal communities to get a sense of how variations in climate affect the water they depend upon, and what can be done to mitigate those impacts. 

A Local Take On The Paris Climate Talks

Dec 15, 2015

  

Climate change has been the focus of international attention all month as world leaders convened for the UN global climate summit in Paris. To get a read on what people in our region think, our reporters talked to some Reno-Tahoe locals and a University of Nevada, Reno researcher for their takes.

Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe

Mt. Rose ski area is armed with a slew of snow-makers, and as long as Mother Nature cooperates with cold, dry conditions, the resort will open this week. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss has the details.

With advertising that reads El Nino Is Coming...Get Your Season Pass Today the Mount Rose ski area is banking on a better winter, finally. 

The Nature Conservancy

Independence Lake is just north of Truckee but is perhaps one of the last hidden gems of the Sierra. It’s pristine, quiet, and it serves as Reno’s last resort water supply—all reasons why more than twenty agencies are partnering to preserve it. For our series Beyond Tahoe: Exploring Our Waterways, KUNR News Director Michelle Bliss heads to this small, relatively unknown, lake to learn more.

In order to set foot on the rocky, seemingly untouched shore of Independence Lake, it’s recommended that you have 4-wheel drive. 

The state's drought summit wrapped up Wednesday after three days of in-depth presentations from every type of water stakeholder in Nevada. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss has the details.

There was a lot of talk in Carson City this week about how to better manage, save, share, and measure our water. 

Nevada is in its fourth year of severe drought. Reno Public Reno’s Anh Gray reports that officials from the Nevada Department of Wildlife say that’s why they’re receiving more calls about animal sightings.

Fall is the typical time of year when wild animals are looking to put on weight for the coming winter months.

Alternative Crops Pose Challenges For Parched Farmers

Sep 17, 2015
Julia Ritchey

Earlier this week, we heard from a Yerington farmer trying to raise ducks as a way to supplement his income. In fact, many Nevada farmers are trying innovative strategies to beat the drought. Reporter Julia Ritchey met with an onion farmer who's looking to the future.

"So the onions come through single file on each lane, and when they pass under that box, there's a series of cameras there and the cameras take several pictures of each onion..."

Short On Water, Farmer Tries Desert Ducks

Sep 16, 2015
Julia Ritchey

For the first time in state history, Nevada water officials are preparing to restrict groundwater pumping for the Smith and Mason valleys. Farmers and ranchers there are already operating on thin margins because of the drought. Our reporter Julia Ritchey visited the agricultural community of Yerington to see how one farmer is coping.

"We'll start here; it's as a good as anywhere. You'll be able to see, like mine,  I have fields that have nothing growing just basically weeds because of no water... It’s basically fallowed because you can’t irrigate it."

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