Business and Economy

Our series “Squeezed Out,” on housing shortages facing Reno and Tahoe, continues with reporter Amy Westervelt’s story on how tourism affects Tahoe residents.

On my street in Truckee, there are about 20 houses. But only three of us live here. That's not uncommon throughout the Tahoe region, where more than sixty-five percent of the housing stock is second homes. In many discussions of economic development and housing in the region, it's the elephant in the room.

Courtesy Domus Development

The Reno-Tahoe area is facing a severe shortage of affordable housing, impacting everyone from families to employers to even the police force. In this first story of our series on the subject, "Squeezed Out,"  Reno Public Radio's Amy Westervelt visited a side of Tahoe most people don't see. 

"I just kicked a liquor bottle, in a park where there are unfortunately a lot of kid bikes."

That's Heidi Hill-Drum, executive director of the Tahoe Prosperity Center, showing me around one of the few affordable housing options in King's Beach: a run-down trailer park.

Rachel Arst McCullough

The monthly event series Silicon Mountain is celebrating a new livestream that lets anyone join in, and a regular viewing party at a Reno co-working space. Reno Public Radio’s Amy Westervelt went to one of those meet-ups to learn more.

"Hi there, I'm here to talk about 'Why hackathons,' ..."

Chief Executive Magazine

Nevada ranks ninth overall for being business-friendly. That's according to a newly published survey of CEOs. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick has more.

Alexa Ard

Reno City Council got its first look at a proposed billion-dollar redevelopment project that would span several city blocks in downtown. 

The ambitious residential development, dubbed West Second District, would take 10 years to build and include the tallest building in the city, three acres of tree canopy and a park. 

Colin Robertson is the director of communications for the Don J. Clark Group, the principal architect and developer behind the project. He told council that the district will be focused on sustainability. 

Noah Glick

Former University of Nevada, Reno President Joe Crowley is releasing a collection of poetry this week. The book, entitled Hats Off to the Cap, is published by local, independent Baobab Press. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick recently paid them a visit.

As I walk into Sundance Books and Music, a quiet, yet imposing century-old Victorian nestled within Midtown Reno, I first notice the high ceilings and corner desk typewriter.

“What does your poem read here?” I ask.

“I think I put them in the right order. It’s Be Silly, Be Kind, Be Honest.”

Courtesy Sierra Nevada College

We’re headed into graduation season soon, and Reno Public Radio’s Amy Westervelt has the story of one local college student who has already scored a CEO gig. 

By the time Sasha Severance celebrates her graduation from Sierra Nevada College in May, she’ll have been a CEO for about three months.

Severance owes that opportunity to Elevate Blue, a tech accelerator in Incline Village, which essentially builds companies around great ideas.

Men In Nevada Make 15% More Than Women

Apr 15, 2016
401(K) 2012 / CC BY-SA 2.0

A new study from Congress's Joint Economic Committee says in Nevada, men make almost 15 percent more money than women. But that's actually somewhat good news considering the national pay gap is 21 percent.

Noreen Farrell is executive director of the nonprofit group Equal Rights Advocates. She suggests the Silver State follow the lead of neighboring California and pass a law protecting workers who compare salaries.

Ready, Set, Pitch!

Apr 14, 2016
Startup Weekend Reno

The sixth installment of Startup Weekend kicks off Friday at Greater Nevada Field, formerly the Aces Ballpark, in downtown Reno. Our reporter Julia Ritchey has more. 

Aspiring entrepreneurs will brainstorm their best ideas over the weekend in a competition aimed at fostering startup culture.  

Attendees are given 54 hours to come up with an idea, form a team and work on a website and marketing plan before pitching to a panel of judges. 

Bryan McArdle of the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada is one of the organizers.

WalletHub

Nevadans were ranked as some of the least financially savvy people nationwide. Reporter Rocio Hernandez explains why.

While the recession may have hit the Silver State hard, it's not the only reason it came in third as one of least financially literate states. The study by WalletHub, a financial site, found that many Nevadans lacked a rainy day fund and good credit scores. 

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