agriculture

Using Goats To Fight Invasive Species

Feb 28, 2018
Paul Boger

Whether it's hoary cress, with its tiny white flowers and hairy leaves, or Scotch thistle, a plant with spiny wings that can grow up to 12 feet tall, Nevada has a problem with noxious weeds. But some ranchers may have found a way to effectively deal with the invasive species: goats. Our reporter Paul Boger went out into the field to learn more.

Holly Hutchings

The Carson Valley just hosted its Eagles and Agriculture event for the sixteenth year, helping passers-by see eagles and other birds that populate the area in the winter months. Holly Hutchings reports.

Ken Lund / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

With Governor Sandoval’s reluctant approval, the EPA can now propose adding the Anaconda Copper Mine site to its National Priority List. The move would open up federal funding to help in cleanup efforts. But there’s ongoing concern that it could create a negative stigma for area farmers. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

David Peri, along with his wife Pam, are the owners of Peri and Sons Farms.

“Our big thing that we moved down here to do is fresh market onions,” says Peri. “We’re one of the larger grower/packer/shippers in the country.”

Growing A Local Food System In Tahoe

Mar 25, 2016
Courtesy Tahoe Food Hub

It's spring and that means our farmer's markets will be opening up again soon. Meanwhile, a new approach to local food is bringing fresh veggies to the masses up in Tahoe. Reno Public Radio's Amy Westervelt went on a farm run with Tahoe Food Hub founder Susie Sutphin to find out more.

Every week, Susie Sutphin makes the drive from Truckee down to the Sierra foothills to pick up produce from farmers. Like this guy:

Washoe County Mulls Hoop House Rules

Mar 9, 2016
Warren IC / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Washoe County Board of Commissioners is mulling how gardening hoop houses should be regulated, if at all. Our contributor Bob Conrad of ThisisReno has the story.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Nevada has seen an increase of more than 1,000 farms since 2007, most notably among small farm operations. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

Even though Nevada imports most of its food supply, the local farm movement is here to stay.

Dr. William Payne, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources at the University of Nevada, Reno.
UNR

Not only will our world in the coming decades have possibly two billion more people consuming significantly more food, that food will need to be produced in harsher climates with less water. Solutions to such daunting realities are at the heart of the work of the University of Nevada, Reno's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources (CABNR).

Michelle Bliss

The CDC has been sounding the alarm about the link between antibiotics in meat and antibiotic resistance in humans, but a new report finds that antibiotic-free options are still relatively scarce. Reno Public Radio’s Amy Westervelt talked to one Nevada rancher in Fallon who's made the switch.

"See how there's so much less fiber in this year's cow pie?"

State To Curb Pumping In Smith, Mason Valleys

Oct 7, 2015
Julia Ritchey

After four years of drought, the state wants to restrict the amount of groundwater being pumped for agriculture in the Smith and Mason valleys.  Reno Public Radio’s Julia Ritchey reports.

Farmers have already voluntarily cut back on their use of these supplemental wells, which they've relied more heavily on due to lack of surface water from the parched Walker River.

But Jason King, the state engineer, says it isn't enough in these dry conditions.

Alternative Crops Pose Challenges For Parched Farmers

Sep 17, 2015
Julia Ritchey

Earlier this week, we heard from a Yerington farmer trying to raise ducks as a way to supplement his income. In fact, many Nevada farmers are trying innovative strategies to beat the drought. Reporter Julia Ritchey met with an onion farmer who's looking to the future.

"So the onions come through single file on each lane, and when they pass under that box, there's a series of cameras there and the cameras take several pictures of each onion..."

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