Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

Wimbledon is the world’s oldest tennis tournament, and it occupies a special place in the hearts of many players. Former champion Boris Becker once called it the most important tournament there is. It’s also a summer tradition across Britain, even for those who aren’t lucky enough to nab tickets.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with The Independent’s tennis corespondent Paul Newman about what makes Wimbledon unique, and the role of tradition at the tournament.

After days of breathless waiting, people around the world watched as 12 boys and their soccer coach trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand were rescued by military divers.

The story captivated audiences for weeks. But other concurrent disasters, like deadly flooding in Japan and the wreck of a tourist boat off the Thai coast, received less attention.

Trap shooting teams used to be found on many high school campuses in New York’s North Country. They lost favor amid the push for stricter gun laws. But now, the sport’s coming back: Over the last couple years, 16 trap shooting teams have started up in the region. They’re coed, with members as young as 12.

A new study published this week in the field of senolytics might provide a key to anti-aging. Scientists have found that in using compounds to kill off so-called senescent, or aging, cells, the lifespan and agility of mice increased.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sharon Begley (@sxbegle), senior science writer at the health and medicine publication STAT.

Whitney Houston’s rise to music stardom began when she was in her early 20s with the release of her debut album in 1985. She went on to become one of the best-selling musical artists of all time.

But behind the scenes, her personal life was bedeviled by drugs, family and marital issues. Houston died of an accidental drowning involving drugs in a hotel bathtub at age 48.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR) about President Trump’s choice for the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh.

Recently in the Navajo Nation in northern Arizona, more than 100 wild horses were found dead — drowned in the thick mud surrounding a dried-up watering hole. The images, some of the most alarming published about the drought that’s been plaguing the Southwest, have prompted people both on and off the reservation to take action.

Just after midnight Eastern Time tonight, another round of trade tariffs are slated go into effect on around $34 billion worth of Chinese machinery, auto parts, and medical devices. China says it’ll respond immediately with equivalent tariffs on U.S. products, which will impact pork farmers, cheese producers and more.

Rodney Smith Jr. is mowing lawns this summer — not only at his home in Huntsville, Alabama, but in all 50 states, including Alaska and Hawaii. And he’s doing it for free.

Smith (@iamrodneysmith) says his goal is to help the elderly, people who are disabled, veterans and single mothers, and his nonprofit organization Raising Men Lawn Care Service has gotten young kids involved in the effort.

This week marks one year since pot shops starting selling legal recreational marijuana in Nevada. The rollout came just eight months after voters approved a ballot measure in 2016.

Critics initially called out the state, saying sales began before all the kinks were worked out. But 12 months in, Nevada has surpassed its tax revenue goals and is looking forward to more industry growth.

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