Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

It’s been another busy week on social media, with users sharing photos of protests as migrant parents waited to be reunited with their children after being separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. First lady Melania Trump also caused a firestorm over a jacket she wore to visit a children’s shelter in Texas. And New Zealand’s Prime Minister gave birth to a baby girl — and Twitter is celebrating.

Preserving A River With A Pint

Jun 21, 2018

Arizona’s Verde River has a lot of competing users: city dwellers, farmers, kayakers and environmentalists. They all want its water in different ways, but a new project aims to unite everyone over a glass of beer. A farm in Camp Verde, about 90 miles north of Phoenix, has planted a crop of malt barley to conserve water and give Arizona breweries a key ingredient to craft a truly local beer.

First Lady Melania Trump paid an unannounced visit to a detention center in Texas on Thursday, and at a cabinet meeting at the White House, President Trump said he is directing government agencies to reunite immigrant families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

NPR congressional correspondent Scott Detrow (@scottdetrow) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the latest.

There have been many voices against President Trump’s chosen policy of family separation at the U.S. border.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the views of a supporter of the administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy, conservative talk show host Sandy Rios (@SandyRiosTweet).

Interview Highlights

On supporting the policy

A recent report from the American Psychiatric Association urges people to “participate in policy and advocacy to combat climate change.”

And that’s just one of the medical groups writing about the connection between adverse mental health effects and global disasters related to changing climate.

The policy of separating children from their families at the Mexican border is dividing Republicans as Democrats push to end the practice.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sen. Chris Van Hollen (@ChrisVanHollen), a Democrat from Maryland, about visiting a border patrol processing center over the weekend in McAllen, Texas.

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Across the country and beyond, drug donations are quietly emerging. At least 37 states in the U.S. have created drug donation programs for unused medication.

Undergraduate applicants to the University of Chicago no longer have to include SAT or ACT scores in their applications. It’s the first top-tier university to make the tests optional, though a growing number of other schools are making similar moves.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with James Nondorf, dean of admissions and vice president of enrollment and student advancement at the University of Chicago.

A federal judge Tuesday approved AT&T’s plan to acquire Time Warner, in an $85 billion deal with sweeping consequences for consumers and the media industry. AT&T has promised to close the deal by June 20.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Roben Farzad (@robenfarzad), who hosts the podcast “Full Disclosure.”

Chavie Weisberger grew up in an ultra-Orthodox Hasidic community in Monsey, New York, where she raised her three children after her 2008 divorce. But as she began questioning her faith and her sexuality, her neighbors told the religious authorities there that she was allowing secular behavior in her home.

How Religious Courts Impact Trying To Leave The Ultra-Orthodox Community

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