All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3:30pm - 5:30pm, 6pm - 7pm (Weekend ATC: Saturday & Sundays 5pm - 6 pm

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting.

In the 40 years since it debuted on 90 public radio stations in 1971, hosts, producers, editors and reporters and even the audience have changed. Yet one thing remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays (hosted today by Arun Rath).

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

To visit the show's web page, click here.

KUNR Local Host: Esther Ciammachilli

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Business
4:01 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

No Quick Fixes For Drivers Affected By Air Bag Recall

The 2002 Honda CR-V is one of dozens of car models subject to a recall for faulty air bags. The air bag manufacturer, Takata, supplies bags for more than 30 percent of all cars and is one of only three large air bag suppliers.
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety AP

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 5:09 pm

Most auto recalls usually involve one carmaker at a time, but a massive recall this week affects not just one, but 10, ranging from BMWs to Toyotas.

At the center of it is Takata, a little-known but extremely important auto parts maker. The company makes more than one-third of the air bags in all cars.

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Around the Nation
3:35 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Was CDC Too Quick To Blame Dallas Nurses In Care Of Ebola Patient?

Dallas nurse Nina Pham speaks at a press conference after she was confirmed free of Ebola and released from a National Institutes of Health facility on Friday.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Dallas nurse Nina Pham was discharged from a National Institutes of Health hospital in Maryland Friday, where doctors confirmed she was free of the Ebola virus.

Pham's colleague Amber Vinson is also said to be free of Ebola, though she remains in a hospital in Atlanta.

While their progress is being cheered, many nurses around the country still feel their profession unfairly received blame for the errors in treating Ebola in Dallas.

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This Week's Must Read
3:31 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

For The Midterm Elections, A Book On 'What It Takes' To Win

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

In less than two weeks, Americans will go to the polls to vote in the midterm elections. At least, some of them will — about 40% of eligible voters, if past elections are any indication. This year's races have already made stars — some rising, some falling — out of Americans hoping to represent their states and districts.

Some, like Kansas Senate hopeful Greg Orman and Georgia governor candidate Jason Carter, may pull off surprising victories. Others, like Wendy Davis in the Texas governor race have seen their once bright lights fade.

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Africa
1:37 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Boko Haram Hasn't Acted On Promise To Release Kidnapped Girls

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Commentary
1:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Week In Politics: Ebola, Midterms

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now politics with our regular commentators, columnists David Brooks of The New York Times, who's in New Orleans this week, and E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post and the Brookings Institution, who's in the studio here in Washington. Hello to both of you.

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Energy
1:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Wanted: Wind Turbine Mechanic — Must Be Daredevil, Skilled With Hands

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Health
1:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

New York City Praised For Response To New Ebola Patient

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
1:33 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

New York Ebola Case Raises Questions About U.S. Readiness

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
3:29 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Calling 911 On Your Cell? It's Harder To Find You Than You Think

The Fairfax County 911 Center in Virginia takes calls during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. It was relatively easy to locate callers when most people used landlines. But most 911 calls now come from cellphones, which can pinpoint a callers' location only within 100 to 300 meters.
Greg E. Mathieson Sr. Mai/Landov

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 3:57 pm

Today's mobile phones can do almost everything a computer can. But we still need them for their most basic purpose: making phone calls — especially in emergencies.

Yet existing technology can't always pinpoint a caller's location, particularly when a 911 caller is indoors.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed new regulations for wireless carriers to help address the problem, but so far, wireless providers are resisting the changes.

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Around the Nation
3:13 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Park Service Construction Damaged Native American Burial Sites

Jim Nepstad, superintendent of Effigy Mounds National Monument in northeast Iowa, stands at the top of a bluff looking over the Mississippi River.
Clay Masters NPR

Originally published on Fri October 24, 2014 11:10 am

Imagine being able to drive an all-terrain vehicle right up next to a sacred earthen Native American burial mound.

At Effigy Mounds National Monument, you can. Three million dollars' worth of illegal construction projects went on for a decade at one of the nation's most sacred Native American burial grounds in northeast Iowa. And it happened under the watch of the National Park Service.

The park didn't do the proper archaeological studies before installing an intricate boardwalk system that now encircles ancient burial mounds that are shaped like bears and birds.

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