All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3:30pm - 5:30pm, 6pm - 7pm (Weekend ATC: Saturday & Sundays 5pm - 6 pm

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting.

In the 40 years since it debuted on 90 public radio stations in 1971, hosts, producers, editors and reporters and even the audience have changed. Yet one thing remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays (hosted today by Arun Rath).

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

To visit the show's web page, click here.

KUNR Local Host: Esther Ciammachilli

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Composer ID: 
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Pages

Environment
2:26 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Coping In A Drier World: California's Drought Survival Strategy

The San Luis Reservoir in central California is the largest "off-channel" reservoir in the U.S. It is currently at less than 30 percent of its normal capacity.
Kirk Siegler NPR

The past few years have been California's driest on record. Forecasters predict that punishing droughts like the current one could become the new norm.

The state uses water rationing and a 90-year-old water distribution system to cope until the rains come. The system is a huge network of dams, canals and pipes that moves water from the places it rains and snows, to places it typically doesn't like farms and cities.

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U.S.
1:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

How Did 'Good Girls' From Colorado Get Recruited By ISIS?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Reviews
1:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Music Review: 'You're Dead!' By Flying Lotus

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
4:05 am
Wed October 22, 2014

'Post' Editor Bradlee Helped Define Modern American Journalism

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:09 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:19 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

Patients in a clinic line up to get a smallpox shot on Feb. 24, 1962, in Leopoldville, Congo. Health workers used vaccination campaigns to finally eradicate smallpox by 1980.
AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 7:22 am

The World Health Organization says that efforts are on track to distribute an experimental Ebola vaccine in West Africa in January.

Two potential vaccines are now being tested for safety in people, and Russia is developing another one. While quantities will be limited, scientists say even a relatively small supply of vaccine can help bring the epidemic under control.

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

In More Cities, That Doggie In The Window Is Not For Sale

A puppy waits at an adoption event in Miami last year. The city is now considering a ban on the sale of puppies in retail pet stores. Cities and towns in several states have passed similar bans, aimed at cracking down on substandard, large-scale puppy breeders.
Wilfredo Lee AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 8:47 am

Just about everyone loves puppies. But around the country, there's heated disagreement about where, and from whom, people can get one.

While the large national pet store chains don't sell dogs, other chains and shops do. But in several states, including Florida, cities are passing laws that ban puppy sales in pet stores.

At the Petland store in Plantation, Fla., a suburb of Ft. Lauderdale, customers come in all day long to look at and play with the puppies. At this store, in fact, doggie accessories and puppies are all that owner Vicki Siegel sells.

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Goats and Soda
2:27 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

For Healthy Liberians, Life Continues — With Some Adjustments

Angie Gardea depends on her job at a hair salon to put food on the table. But because of the Ebola outbreak, business has been slow. Customers are afraid to come in.
Michaeleen Doucleff NPR

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:01 am

Ebola has killed more than 1,300 people in Liberia's capital of Monrovia. But for the million-plus residents who aren't sick, life goes on even as their city is reshaped by death.

On market day, the downtown is teeming with shoppers and merchants and people just hanging out. It almost looks like commerce as usual until you notice all the "Ebola buckets," elevated plastic containers with spigots that deliver a chlorine solution for hand-washing.

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Remembrances
2:27 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

Model Remembers Oscar De La Renta As An 'Extraordinary Gentleman'

Bethann Hardison said that Oscar de la Renta wasn't scared about putting models of color on the runway in his clothes.
Evan Agostini AP

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 5:48 am

Bethann Hardison was one of the "spiritual mothers of the supermodels who ruled the '90s," and she credited some of her rise to prominence to Oscar de la Renta, the influential Dominican-born fashion designer who died this week at the age of 82.

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Asia
2:27 pm
Tue October 21, 2014

North Korea Allows Detained American To Leave

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 4:01 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Business
4:48 pm
Mon October 20, 2014

Unrest In Ferguson May Speed Up Decline Of Real Estate

Children watch from their home in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 20 as people march about a mile to the police station to protest the shooting of Michael Brown. Brown's shooting in the middle of a street by a Ferguson police officer on Aug. 9 sparked protests, riots and looting in the St. Louis suburb. Some people are ready to leave the troubled city. Others say they will remain no matter what.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Tue October 21, 2014 10:09 am

A grand jury has yet to decide whether it will indict Darren Wilson, the police officer who fatally shot 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., this summer.

Protests over Brown's death are ongoing in Ferguson, though they are calmer than the sometimes violent clashes that happened immediately after the shooting.

Still, many residents there are worried about public reaction once the grand jury announces its decision, and some say they've had enough. They're planning to move. That could accelerate an already existing trend in the region.

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