Buñuelos: Preserving A Mexican Tradition

Sep 26, 2017

Fiesta on Wells is an annual street fair celebrating Latino culture in Reno. KUNR reporter Natalie Van Hoozer stopped by to learn more. 

Wells Avenue is known for its Latino restaurants and businesses. For this event, the street is lined with booths for nonprofit organizations and vendors.

Their tables are piled high with leatherwork, brightly painted crafts, and food.

I stop at a stand with a red sign that reads “Alberto’s Snacks”. Alberto and his wife Mayra are standing amid cardboard boxes, filled with freshly made bags of ribbon fries and a treat called “buñuelos”.

Ribbon fries (left) and Buñuelos (right).
Credit Natalie Van Hoozer

For Alberto, who is from Jalisco, Mexico, “Buñuelos” are a Mexican tradition.

“El buñuelo es como un postre, porque es dulce con azúcar, sabor naranja, vanilla,” dice él.

(“El buñuelo is like a dessert, because it´s sweet with sugar, orange flavor, vanilla,” he says.)

Buñuelos are fried, crunchy tortillas, which go well with drinks like hot chocolate and coffee. While the couple has been making their snacks for about three years for family and friends, their business is new.

Alberto says they are off to a successful start serving at events and parties because buñuelos and other Mexican foods aren’t very easy to find.

For him, the food he makes is more than just a business.

“Para que no nos olvidemos de México, toda nuestra gente mexicana que estamos aquí, y no olvidarnos de nuestras raíces de México,” dice él.

(“So that we don´t forget Mexico, all of our Mexican people that are here, and that we don´t forget our Mexican roots.,” he says.)

Natalie Van Hoozer is a senior at the Reynold’s School of Journalism and works for Noticiero Móvil, a Spanish-English multimedia news outlet for Northern Nevada. 

Thank you to Anthony Leman of the University of Nevada, Reno, Spanish graduate program for help with translation.