Paul Boger

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Paul Boger

Education, criminal justice reform, increasing the use of renewable energy, those are just some of the issues lawmakers are trying to tackle this legislative session. With yet another legislative deadline looming in the days ahead, lawmakers are scrambling and working late into the evening in order to pass as much legislation out of committees as possible. That’s why Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick spoke to our political reporter Paul Boger, to learn the latest from Carson City.

Conversion Therapy Ban

Amadscientist: Wikipedia CC

Lawmakers are quickly approaching the halfway point of the 2017 Legislative session. There are officially 62 days left, and there’s still a lot of work to be done. So let’s recap the past seven days.

COMMITTEE BILL INTRODUCTIONS

Monday marked yet another deadline for the introduction of bills by committees. Over the course of the day, the legislature 21 committees dropped another 175 bills.

Paul Boger

An effort to renew the GOP’s controversial plan to replace the Affordable Care Act seems to be gaining little traction. Yet, Nevada officials are still worried that any changes to the nation's current health care laws could result in thousands of Nevadans losing their coverage. 

Paul Boger

It's been a busy "week 7" at the Nevada legislature with the introduction of roughly 2-hundred new bills. Our News Director Michelle Billman spoke to our political reporter Paul Boger to find out the latest.

EQUAL RIGHTS AMENDMENT

Public school advocates are urging lawmakers to oppose any effort to fund Nevada’s school voucher program. 

They’re calling themselves the Coalition to Fight Vouchers. Made up of public education advocacy groups, the coalition met on the steps of the state legislature yesterday, to demand lawmakers put state funds into public schools arguing that Education Savings Accounts hurt students.

Alexa Ard

Monday marked the first major deadline for lawmakers during the 2017 legislative session in Nevada. Legislators worked late into the evening to introduce personal bills.

Paul Boger

A Northern Nevada lawmaker says he may file an ethics complaint against a fellow legislator who was recently outed as a foreign agent for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 

Wikipedia: Creative Commons

State Leaders are pushing back against a proposal that would reopen the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository in Southern Nevada. 

According to the White House’s budget blueprint released Thursday, President Donald Trump is asking Congress to approve 120 million dollars to restart the repository’s operations.

Paul Boger

Sanctuary State...it’s a term that’s cropped up in the months since President Donald Trump took office. With promises from the administration to ramp up deportations, some states hope to protect their undocumented residents by prohibiting their local law enforcement from working with federal immigration officials, and Nevada could become one of the first states to pass such a law.

Paul Boger

 

A voter initiative may soon change how Nevadans register to vote.

 


IP-1 would create a process in which Nevada residents will automatically be registered to vote or have their information updated whenever they go to the DMV.  If voters do not wish to participate in the process, they will have to opt-out.

Pages