Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Photo courtesy of Chris Giunchigliani campaign

This spring, six Nevada democrats are vying to become their party's nominee for governor. Clark County Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani is among the candidates most likely to get the nod this June. The former assemblywoman and head of the state teacher's union has taken on the mantle of the "progressive choice" in this year's election.

Tom Arthur / Wikimedia Commons

In less than 90 days, Nevadans will be heading to the polls to choose the Democratic and Republican candidates for the 2018 general election in November. To get a rundown of who is in the race, KUNR’s News Director Michelle Billman sat down with our Political Reporter Paul Boger to get the latest.

Jacob Solis

Students across the nation participated in a national school walkout Wednesday. The protests were aimed at pressing lawmakers to take action against gun violence in the wake of the mass shooting at a school in Florida last month that killed 17 students and teachers. Our reporter Paul Boger checked in with the students at Earl Wooster High School in Reno.

Just after 10 o'clock in the morning, at least two hundred students from Wooster High gathered in the entryway of the U.S. Post Office on Vassar Street in Reno.

Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval and school leaders across the state want to bolster the number of mental health professionals as part of a plan to improve student safety.

This week, Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval sat down with a majority of the state's school superintendents to discuss ways to improve student safety. When he announced the meeting, Sandoval said he hopes the discussion will lead to recommendations that could be brought to lawmakers next year. 

Reno Attorney Karl Hall is refusing to recuse himself from defending the city against a lawsuit despite demands from the mayor that he step down.

Paul Boger

The Reno City Council has given developers the green light to begin working on a massive housing development in Cold Springs.

There has been no major housing development built in the Truckee Meadows since the 2009 recession. Now a group of developers is looking to build roughly 5,000 new homes in the White Lake Basin north of Reno. But residents already living in the area argue the planned community would create problems by increasing traffic congestion and demand for resources like water.

Kevin Bass

Thursday marked California Democratic Governor Jerry Brown's 16th and final State of the State Address. The 30-minute speech celebrated the governor's success at improving the state's economy over the past seven years, but it also laid out an agenda that focused on climate change and infrastructure repair.