Paul Boger

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Rosen's Twitter Page - @RosenforNevada

Republican Senator Dean Heller will face a challenge from Democrat Jacky Rosen in the 2018 general election.

In an email to reporters, Nevada's 3rd District Congresswoman says she is seeking the Democratic nomination for Senator in next year's election. She went on to say that an official announcement would come soon.

Considered a political outsider, Rosen worked as a computer programmer, software designer and president of a synagogue in Henderson until seeking office last year. She only narrowly defeated her opponent, perennial Republican candidate Danny Tarkanian.

REMSA

Republicans in the U.S. Senate are expected to soon release the first draft of a bill aimed at replacing the Affordable Care Act, and healthcare advocates in Nevada are discussing what those changes could mean for rural parts of the state.

Elizabeth Katseanes says she would possibly be homeless right now if it hadn't been for the state's expansion of Medicaid.

"I got sick and I was unable to do my job as an aesthetician and I could not qualify for insurance because I didn't have income even though I had savings and that was my only option," says Katseanes.

Paul Boger

Nevada’s Republican Governor Brian Sandoval put the 2017 legislative session to bed last week when he took final action on a set of bills that had garnered national attention. 

Alexa Ard

The 79th Regular Session of the Nevada Legislature is officially over. After 120 days, lawmakers have wheeled, dealed, debated and ultimately passed hundreds of bills as well as a budget worth billions of dollars over the next two years. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

Paul Boger

The clock is running out at the Nevada Legislature, with lawmakers facing a midnight deadline to close out a state budget for the next two years. 

Michelle Matus

A court order could delay implementation of early recreational marijuana sales in Nevada. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

A district court judge in Carson City has placed a temporary restraining order preventing the state’s Department of Taxation from enforcing a deadline for submitting recreational marijuana license applications.

Riley Snyder, The Nevada Independent

Drama in the 2017 legislative session hit critical mass Thursday, after Senate Republicans voted against a bill that would have created a new tax on the sale of recreational cannabis. By killing the measure, lawmakers began a tit-for-tat domino effect that could possibly end in the governor calling a special legislative session. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

There's less than one week left in Nevada's 2017 Legislative Session, and lawmakers are working around the clock to put the finishing touches on bills while at the same time finalizing a budget for the next two years. Reno Public Radio's News Director Michelle Billman spoke with our political reporter Paul Boger to get the latest from Carson City.

For a comprehensive look at where bills are in the legislative process, click here.

Increased tourism and the tax money associated with it was one of the top arguments for legalizing recreational cannabis. But how have other states dealt with pot tourism? Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger spoke with Northern Colorado Community Radio's Luke Runyon about what's going on in his state.

“Let’s chat about the impact legalized recreational marijuana had had on Colorado’s tourism industry.”

Martin Alonso/Creative Commons

Nevadans will soon be able to purchase recreational marijuana legally in Nevada. This poses a dramatic shift in the relationship between cannabis and law enforcement. For decades, simply possessing the drug was a felony across the Silver State. But with recent changes, how will police enforce the laws now?

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