Noah Glick

News Reporter

Noah Glick is from the small town of Auburn, Indiana and comes to KUNR from the Bay Area, where he spent his post-college years learning to ride his bike up huge hills. He’s always had a love for radio, but his true passion for public radio began when he discovered KQED in San Francisco. Along with a drive to discover the truth and a degree in Journalism from Ball State University, he hopes to bring a fresh perspective to local news coverage.

When he’s not doing radio-related stuff, he’s probably doing crosswords, drinking coffee, playing guitar—or trying to do all three at once. He lives in Sparks with his brother, sister-in-law, two nephews and four animals.

Western Pond Turtles have been around Nevada for 150 years. Scientists say the species can be a good indicator of ecosystem health, because they use rivers, ponds and land systems.
Noah Glick

The Western Pond Turtle has been a part of the Carson Valley since at least the 1860s. Yet, scientists know very little about the population in Nevada—and what it can tell us about overall ecosystem health.

A look at some of the paintings done by people with disabilities at High Sierra Industries' iChoose program
Jennie Stokes / High Sierra Industries

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 20 percent of Americans live with a disability.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick introduces us to Jennie Stokes, an activities specialist at High Sierra Industries in Reno. Stokes helps people with special needs get out into the community.

Noah Glick

More than one in five adults in Nevada live with a disability. Yet, most of them looking for work are unable to find a job.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick explores the barriers to employment for people with special needs and what’s being done to help.

Noah Glick

The University of Nevada, Reno community came together Wednesday to address the actions taken by a UNR student during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month.

But many faculty and students are frustrated at what they say is a lack of action by the school’s administration to fight racism and bigotry on campus.

Noah Glick

The annual Lake Tahoe Summit brings together elected representatives from Nevada and California to discuss the future of the basin.

This year, officials focused on the impact of climate change and urban development on its famed clarity.

Ken Lund / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Anaconda Copper Mine near Yerington, which has been out of operation since the late 1990s, may soon have a new cleanup strategy.

The state of Nevada is hoping to take the lead on restoring the site, and has formally requested that the EPA hold off on adding it to its national priority list.

University of Nevada, Reno

A solar eclipse is set to sweep across much of the U.S. Monday morning. And while northern Nevada is not in the direct path, residents here will get a rare glimpse as the moon passes in front of the sun.

One University of Nevada, Reno professor is headed up to Oregon to not only take in the eclipse, but also to hopefully bring back some new findings about the cosmos.

Alexa Ard

A University of Nevada, Reno student made headlines this weekend after a photo showing him at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia circulated nationwide.

The 20-year-old's participation sparked outrage among many fellow students and community members, who are calling for his expulsion. But UNR President Marc Johnson said Monday the school does not have a legal reason to do so.

Nevada Seismological Laboratory / University of Nevada, Reno

Humans account for an overwhelming majority of wildland fires, with federal agencies estimating that 80 to 90 percent are caused by people.

Target shooting is just one of several ways that people can spark flames. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick look at other actions worrying local officials, and finds out what happens to those caught starting fires.

Noah Glick

While heat and thunderstorms bring heightened potential for wildfires, the majority of wildfires are human-caused.

Target shooting in particular has been the cause of several blazes this year, including the Detweiler Fire that has destroyed more than 130 structures in Mariposa County, California.

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