Noah Glick

News Reporter

Noah Glick is from the small town of Auburn, Indiana and comes to KUNR from the Bay Area, where he spent his post-college years learning to ride his bike up huge hills. He’s always had a love for radio, but his true passion for public radio began when he discovered KQED in San Francisco. Along with a drive to discover the truth and a degree in Journalism from Ball State University, he hopes to bring a fresh perspective to local news coverage.

When he’s not doing radio-related stuff, he’s probably doing crosswords, drinking coffee, playing guitar—or trying to do all three at once. He lives in Sparks with his brother, sister-in-law, two nephews and four animals.

Construction workers on site of an apartment complex being constructed for people 55 years of age and older.
Noah Glick

For our series, Priced Out: The Housing Crunch, our reporters have been speaking to several developers. And some have pointed out one potential reason for rising housing costs: immigration enforcement.

Noah Glick

During our series, "Priced Out: The Housing Crunch," we've looked at the ways rising housing costs have affected various groups within the community, and we've delved into options moving forward.

Now, we're going to look at something a little different.

Noah Glick

With housing costs reaching record highs throughout northern Nevada, potential buyers and builders are looking at alternative options.

One big idea that’s gaining traction nationwide is small: tiny homes.

image of large residential building being constructed
Noah Glick

The housing supply in Northern Nevada is far below demand, which has led to a rapid rise in costs.

Many are calling for more development, but builders in the community say they’re unable to keep up.

The median sales price of a single-family home in Reno is now higher than it was during the peak of the housing boom just before the Great Recession.

This surge in pricing is reminding many in the region of the thriving market of the mid-2000s, as well as the devastation the ensuing crash caused to Northern Nevada.

Outside of major metropolitan areas like the Bay Area and Seattle, Reno has one of the highest median home prices in the American West.

During the Great Recession, unemployment in Nevada reached 14.5 percent. That led the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada, or EDAWN, to try and attract high numbers of jobs to the region.

Now, with low unemployment and rapid growth, local leaders are setting their sights on higher paying tech jobs.

Noah Glick

A new state park is coming to Northern Nevada, opening 12,000 acres and 28 miles of property along the East Walker River.

Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick took a trip to the new Walker River State Recreation Area, which offers access to an area that's been closed to the public for more than 100 years.

"So, this will be a slight path to the group area from here," says Randy Denter, park supervisor for Nevada State Parks. "Right now, it's just a bunch of weeds. So right now, we're just in a big weed field, some tumbleweeds and mustard."

Julia Ritchey

Since the Great Recession, Nevada has made significant investments in diversifying its economy into a new frontier: technology.

Apple, Tesla and Switch have all set up here. So, what does the future look like for this growing industry in northern Nevada?

Noah Glick

The tech industry continues to grow at a rapid pace in northern Nevada, with more companies continuing to move to the region. But what do these jobs actually look like? And what kind of wages can workers expect?

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