Natalie Van Hoozer

KUNR & Reynolds School Business News Intern

Natalie Van Hoozer is a Reno native who grew up listening to KUNR. When she was young, she thought "radio" and "KUNR" were the same word.

She is currently a junior majoring in journalism and Spanish at the University of Nevada, Reno. She loves languages and expanding her cultural awareness and will be studying in Madrid, Spain, during the spring of 2017.

One day she plans to be a bilingual journalist and travel the world. Before that time comes, she hopes to make a positive impact on the Reno community with original, accurate reporting.

In her free time, she enjoys hiking with her dog, taking pictures, playing piano and writing poetry/short stories.

The Tunnel Camp mining site.
Natalie Van Hoozer

The Bureau of Land Management has a team of employees who find and block off abandoned mines in the state of Nevada. KUNR reporter Natalie Van Hoozer tagged along for a rural road trip to find out more. 

Instructors Spencer Allen (left) and Connor Fogal (middle) work with camp participant Logan Mason (right).
Natalie Van Hoozer

Teens have been participating in an inclusive street art camp for Artown, where artists with disabilities and without disabilities work together to create sculptures for public spaces. KUNR reporter Natalie Van Hoozer stopped by to find out more.

Maury Centeno (second from right) owns Safety Glass, a shop for replacing broken windshields.
Natalie Van Hoozer

For many, entrepreneurship can be a difficult process. Now, imagine trying to start a business in a foreign country.  

In Reno, some Latina business owners say this journey has been challenging for them due to cultural differences and language barriers.

While a few of Maury Centeno’s employees sand down a windshield, she’s in the white-walled office next door typing away on her computer. She owns Safety Glass, a windshield replacement company in Reno.

Argentinian Fulbright Scholar Melisa Prior
Natalie Van Hoozer

Despite the attention the presidential election has drawn, less than 60 percent of eligible voters cast a ballot.

Academics from Latin America living in Reno have a unique perspective on the issue of voting, as it is compulsory in many Latin American countries.  

Melisa Prior is a teacher at UNR visiting from Argentina, where those who don’t vote can be fined.

However, she does understand why some Americans aren’t interested in participating.

First year UNR student Evelyn Galvan.
Jennifer Gallagher

Senator Tim Kaine has been speaking both English and Spanish while campaigning as the Democratic vice-presidential candidate. When he recently stopped in Reno for a rally, attendees were surprised that he did not use those bilingual skills.

Kaine did discuss several issues important to the Latino community, including immigration and women’s healthcare, but attendees like Evelyn Galvan would have welcomed the use of Spanish as well. Galvan is a freshman at the University of Nevada, Reno, and a fluent Spanish speaker whose parents emigrated from Guadalajara, Mexico.

The Golden West Motor Lodge sign on Virginia Street in Reno.
Natalie Van Hoozer

Reno City Council recently voted to demolish two downtown motels, leaving some residents wondering, “What will happen to their neon signs?” 

The Aqua Metals refining facility is located in Storey County’s Tahoe Reno Industrial Center.
Natalie Van Hoozer

The Tahoe Reno Industrial Center just welcomed a company in the battery industry, but it’s not Tesla.

Aqua Metals, a company which recycles lead batteries, held a grand opening to unveil the world’s first facility for a process company executives call “AquaRefining.”

More environmentally friendly than smelting, “AquaRefining” dissolves the lead acid from batteries in a water solution instead of heating it and causing emissions.

The neon sign for the Golden West Motor Lodge.
Natalie Van Hoozer

Earlier this month, the Reno City Council made a controversial vote to demolish two downtown motels.

Natalie Van Hoozer takes a look at this particular case and what might be in store for Reno’s vacant buildings as the city grows.

I’m standing on Virginia Street outside of the Golden West Motor Lodge with Britton Griffith-Douglass, the president of the Riverwalk Merchant’s Association. She says that to her, the property is an eyesore.

The Falconer

Jul 12, 2016
Natalie Van Hoozer

 

Marie Gaspari-Crawford stands in the doorway of her outdoor office, the breeze rustling her hair as she looks out at her ranch.  There are rows of leashes hanging from one wall and a freezer full of frozen animal food, but none of this equipment or food is for her dogs. It’s all for her nearly ten falcons and hawks.

Library staff and community members gather for the concluding class of the first session of Startup School at the Washoe County South Valleys Library.
Natalie Van Hoozer

Libraries across the country are taking on new roles in today’s digital age. In Washoe County, libraries are offering programs like Startup School.

When we think of libraries, we often imagine stacks of books and study desks.

“It’s not just a house of books, there’s a lot more opportunity and more and more hands on stuff,” said Morgan Tiar, a Washoe County librarian and instructor for Startup School.

She’s in a meeting room where students like Colleen Lennox are discussing their products.

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