Natalie Van Hoozer

Bilingual Student Reporter

Natalie Van Hoozer is a Reno native who grew up listening to KUNR. When she was young, she thought "radio" and "KUNR" were the same word.

She is currently a senior majoring in journalism and Spanish at the University of Nevada, Reno. She loves languages and expanding her cultural awareness and studied in Madrid, Spain, during the spring of 2017.

One day she plans to be a bilingual journalist and travel the world. Before that time comes, she hopes to make a positive impact on the Reno community with original, accurate reporting.

In her free time, she enjoys hiking with her dog, taking pictures, playing piano and writing poetry/short stories.

Imágen del mapa: G.E. Bullard, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Texto y diseño gráfico: Natalie Van Hoozer
Natalie Van Hoozer

Listen to and read this story in English. 

En el candente debate nacional sobre inmigración usualmente surge la pregunta de ¿por qué los inmigrantes indocumentados no ingresan legalmente a los Estados Unidos?

Nuestra reportera Natalie Van Hoozer ha estado investigando el tema y descubrió que no es tan simple. Se reunió con Michelle Billman, nuestra Directora de Noticias, para analizar el proceso de obtención de una visa.

Journalist Maria Hinojosa, host and managing editor of the NPR program Latino USA.
Natalie Van Hoozer

Escuche y lea la entrevista completa con Maria Hinojosa en español. 

As the anchor and managing editor of the NPR program Latino USA, Maria Hinojosa is considered to be someone at the forefront of reporting by and for people of color, with the show regularly including reporting in Spanish.

Our bilingual reporter Natalie Van Hoozer interviewed Hinojosa in Spanish about the state of bilingual reporting in the U.S. and its challenges, then sat down with our News Director Michelle Billman to recap their conversation.

Periodista Maria Hinojosa del programa Latino USA de NPR.
Natalie Van Hoozer

Listen to and read this story in English. 

Nuestra reportera Natalie Van Hoozer entrevistó a Maria Hinojosa, la presentadora y la editora de Latino USA, un programa de noticias de NPR. Conversaron sobre el periodismo bilingüe en los Estados Unidos.

Algunos de los diputados de Nevada están respondiendo a los posibles cambios de las leyes federales de inmigración. La reportera Natalie Van Hoozer informa. 

Jahahi Mazariego is the UNR Social Services Coordinator and works with the university's undocumented students.
Jolie Ross

When President Donald Trump ordered an end to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, last fall, he told Congress to pass a replacement by March 5, 2018. That did not happen and now those protected by the program could soon be eligible for deportation.

Some of Nevada’s Congressional leaders are responding to possible changes in federal immigration laws. Reno Public Radio’s Natalie Van Hoozer has the story.

Nevada State Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (right) spoke in the U.S. Senate to ask for support in passing the DREAM Act. She also shared a letter from DACA recipient and Reno resident Maria Toca (pictured in middle photo).
Screenshot from a Facebook video posted by the Facebook account of Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

The legislation for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, is still in a state of uncertainty.

Our reporter Natalie Van Hoozer sat down with our news director Michelle Billman to provide some updates.  

Here are seven things to know.

María Toca fue la primera persona en la ciduad de Reno que recibió DACA.
Andrea Jimenez

La Casa Blanca ha manifestado que el martes el Presidente Trump anunciará su decisión sobre el futuro del programa de la Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA, sus siglas en inglés) y la gente de Nevada está reaccionando. Natalie Van Hoozer, reportera de KUNR, informa.

Map image credit: G.E. Bullard, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/  Text and graphic design: Natalie Van Hoozer
Natalie Van Hoozer

Escuche y lea la historia en español. 

The heated national debate on immigration often brings up the question of why undocumented immigrants didn’t enter the U.S. legally.

Our reporter Natalie Van Hoozer has been researching this topic, and she’s finding that it’s not that simple. She sat down with our News Director Michelle Billman to break down the visa process. 

Here are six things to know.

 An artist with the Inside Out Dreamers Project pastes photos of UNR students on the sidewalk who had their photos taken to show solidarity with Dreamers.
Natalie Van Hoozer

 

With continued uncertainty about the future of the Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, a community art project recently stopped at the University of Nevada, Reno, to highlight the issue.

 

The Inside Out Dreamers Project aims to show solidarity with so-called Dreamers by letting community members take their pictures in a photo booth truck. The images are then pasted on the sidewalk for all to see.

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