Michelle Bliss

News

Michelle moved to the Silver State from North Carolina where she led the award-winning public radio newsroom in Wilmington. During her time down South, Michelle earned two regional Edward R. Murrow awards for her coverage of local politics and the water contamination scandal at Camp Lejeune. She also completed her master's degree in creative writing from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.

When she's not covering a local story, Michelle is often working on other nonfiction writing projects, which have appeared in literary journals like River Teeth and Ninth Letter. Outside of writing, Michelle enjoys watching Hokie football games, eating at diners, and hiking with her husband Scott and their three pups: Katie, Cooper, and Mosey.  In April of 2014, Michelle and Scott welcomed a new addition to the Bliss family: a baby girl!

Ways To Connect

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Under a proposed labor agreement reached by the City of Reno and union leaders, Reno firefighters could see a 6 percent bump in pay to restore some of the wages they lost during the recession. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

At the peak of the recession, Reno firefighters saw their pay slashed by almost 14 percent. Even with this proposed boost of six percent, firefighters in Reno would still earn less than what their peers average across the state. 

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Susan Dentzer is senior policy advisor at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the nation’s largest philanthropy focused on healthcare. On Friday, she delivered the commencement address to graduates of the University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno. She also stopped by KUNR to share her message for this latest crop of doctors, and it comes down to three key goals: improving health, improving healthcare, and lowering treatment costs. 

Alexa Ard

A group of urban leaders from across the country recently met in Reno to talk innovation and revitalization for the city. It was for the Vanguard Conference hosted by a national nonprofit called Next City. The group was charged with brainstorming inexpensive, quick ideas for promoting the Biggest Little City.

Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss caught up with two of the participants to learn more. She spoke to local historian Alicia Barber and Noah Silverman, co-founder of the Reno Bike Project which promotes a cycling lifestyle.

University of Nevada, Reno

A seismologist from the University of Nevada, Reno and two of his graduate students have been on the ground in Nepal while that country is dealing with another deadly earthquake this week. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss has the details. 

UNR Professor Steve Wesnousky left Nepal just a few hours before the magnitude 7.3 quake struck on Tuesday. But two of his students were there for the jolt. University Spokesman Mike Wolterbeek has been checking in with them to learn more. 

Many more Nevadans are getting vaccinated for the measles this year.

Reno-Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority

The three largest veterans organizations in the U.S. are all coming to Reno for upcoming conventions, events that are estimated to bring in more than $36 million to the region.  The Reno-Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority recently announced that the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Disabled American Veterans will all be headed to Reno over the next five years. Authority President Chris Baum says having a one-story convention center set Reno apart from competitors like Phoenix, Miami, and San Juan: 

Thomas Vatany / www.planespotters.net

  Nonstop flights from Reno to London were supposed to take off later this year, but the service has already been canceled. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

Thomas Cook Airlines made the call after learning that its customers would have to wait at least three hours to clear U.S. Customs at Reno-Tahoe International Airport. Brian Kulpin, with the airport, says it all comes down to staffing.

"There's a need for more customs agents here in Reno," he explains. "We just added one at the beginning of April, but it's not enough to do the job faster."

With historically high temperatures, low humidity, and dry, dry land, Northern Nevada is facing what could be a devastating fire season. For our ongoing series on the drought and all its ripple effects, Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss ventured out to Washoe Valley where local firefighters have been preparing for what this summer may bring.  

Greg Jackson is an operator for the Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District, and he’s hiking through the woods to a half-dead, towering pine tree that his crew will cut down for practice. 

University of Nevada, Reno

Out on the range, the drought means a lot of things—not having enough water to quench the thirst of your cattle or not having enough feed growing where you need it most.

And then there’s the danger of a wildfire.

All of these problems are leading many ranchers to ship their animals east. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss spoke to Bryan Masini to learn more. He owns ranches outside Yerington and Elko. 

  

Alexa Ard

The Truckee Meadows Water Authority is asking customers to voluntarily cut their water usage by ten percent. To figure out how to actually do that, we reached out to local experts who offered these tips:

Tip #1: Monitor and adjust your irrigation system

People use four times more water in the summer to irrigate their lawns. Here's Master Gardener Wendy Hanson-Mazet from the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension with a tip on how to cut back on that amount.

Tip #2: Use mulch

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