Jacob Solis

Student Reporter

Jacob is a senior at the University of Nevada, Reno studying journalism and political science. Before coming to KUNR in the fall of 2017, Jacob worked for KNPR as a reporter covering Nevada’s 2017 legislative session in Carson City. He has also been a writer and editor for UNR’s student-run newspaper, The Nevada Sagebrush, since 2014.

A Las Vegas native, Jacob is a long-time super-fan of all things public radio. When he’s not out covering stories, he’ll spend his free time catching up on a book, compulsively listening to podcasts, bingeing Veep and learning how not to cook so badly. 

This year's primary elections are just around the corner, and among the seats up for grabs are all the top jobs inside the state's executive branch. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger sat down with our reporter Jacob Solis to find out how those races are shaping up. 

Jacob Solis

Students across the nation participated in a national school walkout Wednesday. The protests were aimed at pressing lawmakers to take action against gun violence in the wake of the mass shooting at a school in Florida last month that killed 17 students and teachers. Our reporter Paul Boger checked in with the students at Earl Wooster High School in Reno.

Just after 10 o'clock in the morning, at least two hundred students from Wooster High gathered in the entryway of the U.S. Post Office on Vassar Street in Reno.

Public Domain

New comments from Senator Dean Heller seem to imply the U.S. Supreme Court could have a vacancy as soon as this summer.

In a Q and A with the J. Reuben Clark Law Society in Las Vegas last week, Heller made a number of bold claims. Among them, a prediction that Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will retire by early summer.

"That being the case, the Republicans are going to have an opportunity to put another supreme court justice in place, which I'm hoping will get our base motivated because right now they're not motivated."

Michelle Matus

 

Sales tax revenues in Nevada are up, partly thanks to recreational pot. We sat down with Bill Anderson, executive director of the Nevada Department of Taxation, to break it all down.

So, the latest revenue numbers are in, and December marked the 90th straight month the state has seen growth in sales tax revenues. What does that mean, both for the state and for its general fund?

Jacob Solis

 

For the first time in 14 years, Washoe County is going to have new voting machines.

 

The new machines are large tablets, about two feet tall and one foot wide. At a price of $4.2 million dollars for the whole system, the tablets will provide a number of new accessibility and usability improvements.

Heather Carmen is the Assistant Registrar of Voters for Washoe County.

 

Jacob Solis

 

A bill from Senator Dean Heller is looking to curb gang violence, in part, by making it easier to deport known gang members or immigrants associated with gangs, but not everyone is so sure it's the right move. Reno Public Radio's Jacob Solis spoke to a law professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas to find out more.

And a warning, this interview does contain some graphic details.

 

 

In his memoir Mulligan’s Wake, author Dave Mulligan recounts some of his outlandish adventures as a young adult following the death of his father. Many of the stories are littered with humor and absurd situations, but at the heart of his writing is an honest look at one man's attempt to grieve for his deceased father in an unconventional way.

Perhaps the most unbelievable story took place decades ago when Mulligan paid a late night visit to Marineland in Palos Verdes, California, which has since closed.

Famartin via Wikimedia Commons

 

On Monday, President Donald Trump finally unveiled his long awaited infrastructure plan. It includes $200 billion in new funding, but under the proposed incentive structure, only 20 percent of any given project can be funded by the federal government.

Alexa Ard

 In September, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced major changes to how colleges and universities handle sexual assault. But long-term changes remain unclear, even three months after the announcement. Our news director Michelle Billman sat down with reporter Jacob Solis to sort this all out.

Alexa Ard

 

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently moved to undo an Obama-era expansion of Title IX enforcement, she left the world of higher education with a lot of questions. The old rules were meant to give more protections to victims of sexual assault on college campuses. DeVos says they go too far and deny those accused of assault due process. But at the University of Nevada, Reno, the people who work with sexual assault victims aren’t so sure.

 

 

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