wildfire

Nevada Seismological Laboratory / University of Nevada, Reno

Humans account for an overwhelming majority of wildland fires, with federal agencies estimating that 80 to 90 percent are caused by people.

Target shooting is just one of several ways that people can spark flames. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick look at other actions worrying local officials, and finds out what happens to those caught starting fires.

Noah Glick

While heat and thunderstorms bring heightened potential for wildfires, the majority of wildfires are human-caused.

Target shooting in particular has been the cause of several blazes this year, including the Detweiler Fire that has destroyed more than 130 structures in Mariposa County, California.

Wildfire Season Begins: Fire Updates

Jun 18, 2017
Inciweb

Wednesday 12:00 p.m. update:

Another fire has broken out, this time 5 miles northwest of Jiggs, Nev. in Elko County. More than 100 firefighters are on scene of the Red Springs Fire, which has now burned 4,060 acres. The blaze is 15 percent contained, and no structures are threatened at this time.

Nevada National Guard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

The Little Valley Fire destroyed 23 homes in October, leaving affected residents to consider whether to rebuild or relocate.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

Driver’s licenses, birth certificates and prescription medications are just some of the tangible items people lost while escaping October’s Little Valley Fire, along with a sense of safety.

“We still get periodic phone calls about somebody that’s just experienced some post-traumatic stress, and so we have some clinicians that we will have deploy to the area just to talk with people and process it.”

Washoe County

October’s Little Valley Fire destroyed 23 homes and burned more than 2,200 twenty-two-hundred acres across Washoe Valley.

As Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports, local officials are now working to rehabilitate the charred landscape.

InciWeb

Get the latest information on this fire on InciWeb, or by following the Inyo national Forest on Twitter, @InyoInfo.

Wednesday, 6:23 a.m. update:

The U.S. Forest Service has announced that the Owens River Fire is officially 5,443 acres, down from their latest estimates of 6,050. The fire is now 32 percent contained.

Twitter user @YubaNet

Friday, 9:58 a.m. update:

The Willard Fire outside Susanville is now 80 percent contained and emergency officials say fire activity remains minimal as crews work to improvement containment lines.

The fire started on Sunday and has burned nearly 2,600 acres, destroying two residences and five other structures. There has also been one minor injury. 

At this point, all evacuations and advisories have been lifted, but more than 1,600 personnel remain on site. 

Wednesday, 10:04 a.m. update:

University of Nevada, Reno

The Hot Pot fire has burned nearly two hundred square miles of rural land near Battle Mountain. One tool area fire crews have been using is a new live-stream remote camera system.

Washoe County Sheriff's Office

While fighting the Hawken Fire in south Reno this week, a helicopter for the Regional Aviation Enforcement Unit, or RAVEN, was almost hit by a drone. Our News Director Michelle Billman spoke to the pilot to learn more about the scare. 

Doug Russell with the Washoe County Sheriff's Office, which runs the RAVEN unit, was flying at nearly 90 miles per hour when a drone came within 50 feet of his aircraft.

Expert: Wet Spring Could Yield More Wildfire Fuel

Apr 13, 2016
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

April showers could produce more fuel for wildfires this summer.

Spring is in full bloom in Northern Nevada, and that has some meteorologists concerned, like Gina McGuire of the Great Basin Coordination Center.

"The main caveat this year is going to be the spring growth with the wet conditions we've seen, a lot of precipitation in the winter and spring, and most likely a wet April and cool April ahead for most of Nevada and most of the great Basin."

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