Title IX

Alexa Ard

 In September, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced major changes to how colleges and universities handle sexual assault. But long-term changes remain unclear, even three months after the announcement. Our news director Michelle Billman sat down with reporter Jacob Solis to sort this all out.

Alexa Ard

 

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently moved to undo an Obama-era expansion of Title IX enforcement, she left the world of higher education with a lot of questions. The old rules were meant to give more protections to victims of sexual assault on college campuses. DeVos says they go too far and deny those accused of assault due process. But at the University of Nevada, Reno, the people who work with sexual assault victims aren’t so sure.

 

 

Jacob Solis

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos moved to undo Obama-era rules for Title IX investigations at colleges and universities, it left a lot of questions. Chief among them: what standard of evidence should schools use when they investigate possible sexual assaults? Reno Public Radio’s Jacob Solis has more.

 

In 2011, the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights issued a Dear Colleague Letter that instructed colleges to use a specific standard in their investigations: preponderance of the evidence.

University Archives, University of Nevada, Reno Libraries

Title IX is in the national spotlight right now  because of a proposal by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to roll back policy enforcement related to how sexual assault and harassment are investigated.

Outside of those complex issues, Title IX also impacts the amount of resources provided to women's athletics because it prohibits sex discrimination in education.