Sparks Middle School

Julia Ritchey

Washoe County got an early start to the school year on Monday, with all but five public schools back in session. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports from one of the district's overcrowded schools.

Julia Ritchey

Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton wrapped up her second visit to Reno last night with a large organizing rally where she focused on several issues important to northern Nevada. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey was there and has more.

The Nevada Gay Men's Chorus sang show tunes at the outset of the rally at Pine Middle School, where Clinton spoke to about 500 people packed into the hot gymnasium.

The former Secretary of State talked education, equal pay and the economy — but lingered on the issue of gun control.

In reviewing what happened before and during the Sparks Middle School shooting in 2013, emergency management and education officials have learned a lot. That's what Democratic Assemblywoman Teresa Benitez-Thompson said during her testimony this week for a bill to update safety procedures in Nevada schools based on lessons learned at Sparks. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

Washoe County Schools

One year ago, 12-year-old Jose Reyes opened fire at Sparks Middle School, killing teacher Michael Landsberry and himself, along with injuring two students. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports students and teachers are gathering Tuesday afternoon in the school's gymnasium to embrace, remember, and heal.

Instead of holding a formal, public event to mark this tragedy, administrators are opting for a quiet, unstructured get-together after classes let out. Overwhelmingly, students and staff have voiced their desire for a typical school day.

Sparks Middle School continues to heal

Sep 16, 2014

It's been almost a year since 12-year-old Jose Reyes opened fire at Sparks Middle School last October, killing a teacher and himself, and injuring two other students. Reno Public Radio's Esther Ciammachilli reports that as the community continues to heal, a federal grant is providing the school with ongoing support.

A $700,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education will pay for trauma therapists to continue working with students and their families. They're keeping in touch with students who are no longer in the building as well.