rural healthcare

NPR

Senate Republicans failed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, and a few GOP leaders have said they’re moving on to other priorities. But there’s still a lot of uncertainty about the future of the nation’s health care system. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray checks in with Director of Health Policy Research at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine John Packham to break down how the ongoing tension in Washington is affecting our state.

If Nevada can't secure health coverage for rural counties, thousands will be losing health insurance by next year.

Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray sat down with the head of The Silver State Health Insurance Exchange program to find out what happened.

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The closure of a Tonopah hospital last year, the only one in a 100-mile radius, has put a huge strain on local volunteer EMS crews.

That region’s struggle highlights pervasive health care challenges facing rural Nevada. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

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Renown Health is expanding its video health consultation network to four rural hospitals in Nevada.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

The videoconferencing service, known as telehealth, allows doctors in Reno to connect with patients in rural areas who may not have access to specialty services, like neurology or pediatrics.

Kirk Gillis is the vice president for accountable care with Renown, and he says the need for specialty care in rural areas is critical.

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Doctor shortages in Nevada have caused critical access issues for rural communities.

Tonopah closed its only hospital last year, leaving residents 100 miles away from the nearest facility. Now health care officials are working to find solutions.

Courtesy Project ECHO

Video technology makes it possible for an urban specialist to see rural patients without anyone having to drive, but it doesn't solve a key underlying issue: there aren’t enough specialists in Nevada. 

In 2010, a liver specialist in New Mexico posed this question: What if we used teleconferencing to train primary physicians in rural counties?