The Rollout

Riley Snyder, The Nevada Independent

Drama in the 2017 legislative session hit critical mass Thursday, after Senate Republicans voted against a bill that would have created a new tax on the sale of recreational cannabis. By killing the measure, lawmakers began a tit-for-tat domino effect that could possibly end in the governor calling a special legislative session. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

Michelle Matus

John Packham is the Director of Health Policy Research at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine. 

California is the sixth largest economy in the world, based on gross domestic product. And in November, voters legalized recreational marijuana, something that will further diversify the state’s portfolio.

Anh Gray

Nearly twenty-eight thousand Nevadans are currently cardholders in the state’s medical marijuana program. And about 3,500 are registered as home growers. Contrary to what some might think, weed isn’t that easy to grow. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores some issues patients encounter while cultivating at home.

Medical and now recreational marijuana is legal in Nevada. Many businesses in the state are grappling with drafting drug policies to ensure workplace safety. Diana Albiniano is a Reno based human resources consultant with Solutions At Work. She helps employers customize policies that work for their type of industry and explains that workplace drug policies should address the specific needs of an industry.

Increased tourism and the tax money associated with it was one of the top arguments for legalizing recreational cannabis. But how have other states dealt with pot tourism? Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger spoke with Northern Colorado Community Radio's Luke Runyon about what's going on in his state.

“Let’s chat about the impact legalized recreational marijuana had had on Colorado’s tourism industry.”

For some medical marijuana cardholders in Nevada, it’s legal to grow their own cannabis. For example, it’s permitted if the strain a patient needs isn’t available or if they live 25 miles or more from a dispensary. One northern Nevada resident takes Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray on a tour of her greenhouse.

Michelle Matus

By legalizing recreational marijuana, Nevada voters have opened up the door for new businesses eager to serve this growing market.

But as Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports, getting into the retail cannabis game comes at a high cost.

Martin Alonso/Creative Commons

Nevadans will soon be able to purchase recreational marijuana legally in Nevada. This poses a dramatic shift in the relationship between cannabis and law enforcement. For decades, simply possessing the drug was a felony across the Silver State. But with recent changes, how will police enforce the laws now?

Michelle Matus

Beginning July 1, Nevadans will have the ability to legally purchase recreational marijuana for the first time. But as that industry prepares to ramp up production and sales many questions remain. Who can use cannabis? Where can they use it? And how will the state regulate its new commodity?

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