Public Health

Renown Health has a received $7.5 million  from the William N. Pennington Foundation to hire and retain pediatric doctors. 

On average in the U.S., there are 15 pediatricians for every 100,000 people, but in Reno, there are less than 10 pediatricians per that many residents.

That shortage is even more profound when you look at more specialized care.

coniferconifer / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Washoe County Health District has confirmed the first pregnancy affected by the Zika virus in this area. In a press release, district officials say that a woman traveled to a country with documented Zika virus transmission and then returned to Washoe County.

The case is actually the fourth confirmed instance of Zika virus infection in the county caused by travel.

Tarek Mahmud/Flikr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/legalcode

State officials have released a report showing West Nile Virus infections in two horses. The infections found in Churchill and Clark Counties indicate some risk for humans and other horses, but Nevada's head veterinarian says there is no cause for alarm. 

Ken Lund / Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

Doctor shortages in Nevada have caused critical access issues for rural communities.

Tonopah closed its only hospital last year, leaving residents 100 miles away from the nearest facility. Now health care officials are working to find solutions.

GM, Flickr (CC by 2.0)

It's one of the most universal recommendations in all of public health: Floss daily to prevent gum disease and cavities.

Except there's little proof that flossing works.

Still, the federal government, dental organizations and manufacturers of floss have pushed the practice for decades. Dentists provide samples to their patients; the American Dental Association insists on its website that, "Flossing is an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums."

Nevada ranks near the bottom nationwide in overall child well-being. That’s according to a study by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

CASAT

The Department of Justice recently awarded 27 schools, including The University of Nevada, Reno, grants to fight sexual violence. UNR received $300,000 and the money will go to the Center for Application of Substance Abuse Technologies.

 Our reporter Marcus Lavergne sat down with CASAT's project coordinator, Justine Hernandez, to talk about the university's efforts.  

Hernandez says part of the problem is that there's an assumption that sexual assaults in college are usually violent acts committed by strangers. 

Renown Paying $9.5 Million In Medicare Fraud Suit

Jul 1, 2016
Renown Health

The operator of the largest hospital and healthcare network in northern Nevada has agreed to pay the Justice Department $9.5 million  to settle allegations of patient-overcharging and Medicare fraud.

The agreement settles a federal whistleblower lawsuit alleging that Reno-based Renown Health submitted false Medicare claims over an eight-year period beginning in 2006.

Kirk Gillis (pictured) and other Renown and Stanford executives announced the partnership to a crowd of 100 people.
Natalie Van Hoozer

Renown Health and Stanford Medicine are teaming up to give patients in Northern Nevada critical access to specialty care.

Hospital executives announced at a press conference that Renown patients will now have an easier time seeking specialized medical services like pediatric healthcare.

“We have kids in this community that are diagnosed with tumors,” said Renown executive Kirk Gillis. “We don’t have the type of physician expertise in this community to manage specialized brain tumors or lung tumors in children.”

American Association of Poison Control Centers

The Washoe County Health District held a series of community meetings recently to discuss what health care providers, public health workers and child care staff can do to help prevent poisonings. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick has more.

Shireen Banerji is with the Nevada Poison Center and was a presenter at the meetings. She says most calls to poison control centers affect young children.

“Over half of our calls, in general, for the Nevada Poison Center, are children five years and younger,” she says.

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