Politics and Policy

A bill under review by Nevada lawmakers would require all businesses in Nevada to offer paid sick leave to employees. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

Under Senate Bill 259 all workers would earn at least an hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours on the clock. That benefit would kick in after a worker has been on the job for 90 days. Democratic Senate Minority Leader Aaron Ford sponsored the measure and testified at a Senate committee meeting Monday.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid is backing New York Sen. Chuck Schumer to succeed him as Democratic leader. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports that Reid issued his endorsement Friday morning, shortly after announcing he will retire next year instead of running for re-election.

Reid was first elected to the Senate almost thirty years ago.

Reid said he wants to make sure Democrats regain control of the Senate next year and that it would be "inappropriate" for him to soak up campaign resources when he could be focusing on putting the Democrats back in power.

Editor's Note: This story won an Associated Press Television and Radio Association (APTRA) award for best spot news in 2015. Learn more

With more than 20 Republican lawmakers supporting AB148, which would allow concealed firearms on college campuses, many at the University of Nevada, Reno worry they could see guns at school, soon. That’s why 200 protestors gathered there Wednesday. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports.

In reviewing what happened before and during the Sparks Middle School shooting in 2013, emergency management and education officials have learned a lot. That's what Democratic Assemblywoman Teresa Benitez-Thompson said during her testimony this week for a bill to update safety procedures in Nevada schools based on lessons learned at Sparks. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

sites.psu.edu

A bill under consideration now would collect more information about obesity in Nevada and the efforts to prevent it. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

A senate committee heard testimony Monday on a bill that would require the state to give an annual report on obesity rates, including a demographic breakdown of the problem.

School campuses have become the latest testing ground for the debate over gun rights in Nevada. A bill that would allow those with concealed weapons permits to bring their guns on campus drew crowds to Carson City this week.

To hear both sides tell it, guns are either the panacea for some of the worst afflictions on campus—sexual assault and school shootings among them—or a toxic solution in search of a problem. 

www.leg.state.nv.us

Two Republican assemblymen are making peace after a physical altercation earlier this week.

John Moore filed a complaint with legislative police against Assembly Majority Leader Paul Anderson saying he refused to let Moore leave an impromptu meeting in a stairwell of the legislative building. This was during a recess when the two were discussing Moore’s vote on a bill.

Assemblywoman Shelly Shelton spent much of her testimony telling anecdotes like this:

"In 2010 in January, Jerald Young defended himself against three men. It was clear from video surveillance he was trying to get away from them, but Mr. Young  was charged with multiple charges, and it took him years to be acquitted by a jury." 

Anh Gray

Right now, there are close to 2,000 portable classrooms in Washoe and Clark Counties alone because of overcrowding. Couple that with calls from business leaders, parents and both parties to improve education in Nevada, and you'd expect a bill that would create more schools to sail through.

“Except that we’re going to do that by stepping on your parents' backs. It’s the parents versus the kids. That’s what you’re doing with this bill. For someone to have the audacity to put this in front of my face and say it’s about schools...”

Nevada’s rural community colleges are cash-strapped. That will only get worse under the current budget proposal. Leaders from those colleges will be in Carson City on Tuesday in hopes of improving their outlook. 

Higher education in Nevada has faced some rough years. Now, the picture is beginning to change, but for rural community colleges, namely Western Nevada College and Great Basin, major cuts are still imminent.

Pages