Politics and Policy

Photo courtesy of Chris Giunchigliani campaign

This spring, six Nevada democrats are vying to become their party's nominee for governor. Clark County Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani is among the candidates most likely to get the nod this June. The former assemblywoman and head of the state teacher's union has taken on the mantle of the "progressive choice" in this year's election.

Tom Arthur / Wikimedia Commons

In less than 90 days, Nevadans will be heading to the polls to choose the Democratic and Republican candidates for the 2018 general election in November. To get a rundown of who is in the race, KUNR’s News Director Michelle Billman sat down with our Political Reporter Paul Boger to get the latest.

Jahahi Mazariego is the UNR Social Services Coordinator and works with the university's undocumented students.
Jolie Ross

When President Donald Trump ordered an end to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, last fall, he told Congress to pass a replacement by March 5, 2018. That did not happen and now those protected by the program could soon be eligible for deportation.

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New comments from Senator Dean Heller seem to imply the U.S. Supreme Court could have a vacancy as soon as this summer.

In a Q and A with the J. Reuben Clark Law Society in Las Vegas last week, Heller made a number of bold claims. Among them, a prediction that Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy will retire by early summer.

"That being the case, the Republicans are going to have an opportunity to put another supreme court justice in place, which I'm hoping will get our base motivated because right now they're not motivated."

Kevin Bass

Thursday marked California Democratic Governor Jerry Brown's 16th and final State of the State Address. The 30-minute speech celebrated the governor's success at improving the state's economy over the past seven years, but it also laid out an agenda that focused on climate change and infrastructure repair.

Paul Boger

 

This week, Nevada regulators approved the final set of rules that will govern the state’s recreational cannabis industry. The regulations come after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently announced that the Justice Department has rescinded a set of internal memos that allowed states to create and regulate cannabis themselves. But as Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports, despite the uncertainty, Nevada’s newest commodity continues to grow across the state.

 

On Friday, the federal government shut down. Part of the reason was that lawmakers were unable to work out a deal on the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program. Among the lawmakers who voted against a spending bill because of the lack of action on DACA, was Nevada’s Democratic Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. She spoke with our political reporter Paul Boger about that vote.

Paul Boger

Immigration advocates in Reno are calling on Congress to overturn the Trump Administration's recent decision to rescind temporary legal status for El Salvador residents living in the U.S. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger reports.


Paul Boger / Reno Public Radio

A district court judge in Carson City has ruled a controversial ballot initiative aimed at banning sanctuary cities in Nevada too confusing to move onto a statewide vote. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

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Starting this week, a new law aimed at curbing Nevada’s growing opioid crisis will require doctors to educate patients about the risks of using the drugs. It will also limit how much medication can be given for each prescription.

Unanimously passed by lawmakers and signed by the Governor earlier this year, the Controlled Substance Abuse Prevention Act went into effect January 1.

Essentially, the law will now require doctors to highlight the inherent risks associated with taking prescription opioids like oxycodone, codeine and morphine.

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