Politics

 

Nevada’s Republican Senator Dean Heller may be in the political fight for his life. Political pundits have named him one of the most vulnerable members of Congress, and now he faces a challenge from within his own party. Our News Director Michelle Billman sat down with our political reporter Paul Boger to get the latest on Senator Heller’s reelection campaign. 

 

Paul, let’s start off with why we’re speaking to each other instead of airing an interview with Senator Heller.

 

Political pundits from across the country have named Senator Dean Heller as one of the most vulnerable Republicans in Congress. And before he can even think about campaigning in a general election, he first has to make it past the primary where he’s facing opposition from the right. Reno Public Radio sat down with Heller’s challenger, Danny Tarkanian, to find out why he’s running against the incumbent.

Why run for this? Why challenge a sitting Republican?

An effort to recall three state Senators from Las Vegas, two Democrats as well as a Republican-turned-independent, could swing the balance of power in the Nevada legislature. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger spoke to Michelle Rindels -- a reporter with the Nevada Independent -- to get the latest on the petitions.

Can you give us a little background on the petition process itself? How does it work, and how do you actually recall an elected officials in Northern Nevada?

In roughly one year's time, Nevadans will head to the polls to select who will represent them in the US Senate. One of the candidates is first-term Democratic Congresswoman Jacky Rosen of Las Vegas. Our reporter Paul Boger sat down with Representative Rosen why she's running for higher office.

You're a first-term Congresswoman, and I wanted to start off by getting your thoughts on how your first months in office are going and how that compares to the expectations you had going in?

Paul Boger

Political campaign paraphernalia is often seen as trash after an election, but for certain collectors, the memorabilia is a lifelong passion. Some believe political items like campaign buttons and bumper stickers are actually tangible pieces of both American history and culture. Our reporter Paul Boger, spoke with Adam Gottlieb from American Political Items Collectors about the hobby and why it's an important part of preserving the nation’s history.

What Would You Say To The President?

Jul 18, 2017
http://www.sheryloring.org/i-wish-to-say/

Volunteer typists will gather at Reno’s City Plaza to dictate messages from passersby who want to convey their thoughts to the president. Artist Shery Oring sat down with our Holly Hutchings to discuss her project, “I Wish to Say.”

Oring has spent the last thirteen years touring the country. On every stop, she collects post cards written by passersby that she sends to the White House. To date, she's mailed more than 3,200 of them from people of all backgrounds and political perspectives.

Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years, but since about 1900, the plant has been politicized and vilified to the point that current decisions about it are still being impacted by decisions made a century ago. Our contributor Bob Conrad of ThisisReno takes a historic look back at the drug and the controversy surrounding it. 

 

Riley Snyder, The Nevada Independent

Drama in the 2017 legislative session hit critical mass Thursday, after Senate Republicans voted against a bill that would have created a new tax on the sale of recreational cannabis. By killing the measure, lawmakers began a tit-for-tat domino effect that could possibly end in the governor calling a special legislative session. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

Paul Boger

President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office have been contentious, to say the least. The Republican administration has sought to put the country back on a "winning track by reforming health care, immigration and taxes." However, Democrats like Nevada’s freshman Senator Catherine Cortez Masto have worked to keep the president’s legislative victories to a minimum.

Reno Public Radio’s political reporter, Paul Boger, sat down with Senator Cortez Masto to get the latest on those efforts, and what she sees as the best way to move America forward.

Airman 1st Class Nadine Y. Barclay/Wikimedia Commons

Nevada’s largest public utility, NV Energy, recently announced it is on track to surpass the state’s renewable energy mandate. Current policy requires utility providers to generate 25 percent of their power from renewables by 2025, but some say that’s not enough. Lawmakers are considering legislation to make the state greener.

It’s fair to say David Gibson’s home in Reno is a shrine to energy efficiency. All you have to do is look in his back yard to find out.

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