Nevada politics

This year's primary elections are just around the corner, and among the seats up for grabs are all the top jobs inside the state's executive branch. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger sat down with our reporter Jacob Solis to find out how those races are shaping up. 

Nevada Legislative Building
Alexa Ard

Reno assemblywoman Amber Joiner, a Democrat, is choosing not to run for reelection in 2018. Joiner was appointed to her seat in Assembly District 24 in 2014, and since then has served for two regular sessions and two special sessions.

 

 

But in an email to The Nevada Independent, Joiner says the financial burden of campaigning and serving is unsustainable.

 

Natalie Van Hoozer

The deadline for people to renew their Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status is fast approaching, and northern Nevadans are organizing legal help. KUNR reporter Natalie Van Hoozer has the story. 

Current beneficiaries of DACA will only be able to renew their status if their paperwork is received by the Department of Homeland Security by October 5. 

NPR

The most recent effort by GOP leaders to partially repeal the Affordable Care Act failed to pass this week. For that vote, Republican Senator Dean Heller stuck with his party by supporting the ‘skinny repeal.’ Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores the possible impact of this vote on his political future.

In a dramatic upset, Arizona Senator John McCain and two other Republicans voted no on the skinny repeal.

Reporter Michelle Rindels is with The Nevada Independent. She says Senator Dean Heller won’t have to take heat for sticking with the majority of his party.

Alexa Ard

The 79th Regular Session of the Nevada Legislature is officially over. After 120 days, lawmakers have wheeled, dealed, debated and ultimately passed hundreds of bills as well as a budget worth billions of dollars over the next two years. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

Paul Boger

The clock is running out at the Nevada Legislature, with lawmakers facing a midnight deadline to close out a state budget for the next two years. 

Controversial therapies that are meant to turn young gay people straight could soon be banned in Nevada.

A bill outlawing psychotherapists and social workers from providing what's called "sexual conversion therapy" to patients under 18 could soon make its way to the governor's desk.

Senate Bill 201 was passed by lawmakers in the Assembly, Tuesday after a 31-8 vote.

Speaking in favor of the measure, Assemblywoman Shannon Bilbray-Axelrod of Las Vegas says the controversial therapy has been shown to lead to depression, homelessness and suicide.

There is less than one month left in the 2017 Legislative Session, and that means, more and more, lawmakers are starting to turn their attention to the state budget. The latest numbers suggest that budget writers will have close to $8 billion to work with over the next two years. Reno Public Radio’s News Director Michelle Billman spoke with our political reporter Paul Boger about the revenue projection and other bills making their way through the process.

Optimistic Revenue Projections

Nearly 370,000 Nevadans could lose their health coverage by 2019 under a plan passed by the U.S. House of Representatives Thursday.

Under the proposed American Health Care Act, Nevada could see drastic changes especially to the number of people covered under the state’s Medicaid program. 

"They can't get in to see, unless they can pay for it, primary care provider," says Chuck Duarte who runs the Community Health Alliance, a federally qualified health center that provides medical, dental and psychological care for thousands of residents in Northern Nevada.

Paul Boger

State lawmakers are one step closer to amending the Nevada Constitution to remove language banning same-sex marriage.

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