law enforcement

Paul Boger

Two hours north of Reno, smack dab in the middle of the Black Rock Desert, is Burning Man. The week-long festival, which is intended to celebrate art and inclusivity, has also become synonymous with party culture and drug use. But despite its remote location, the event takes place on federal land, with law enforcement required to Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports, 

It’s a hot afternoon on the Playa, the winds have been kicking up large dust devils all day, and many Burners have begun the daily ritual of seeking a shady place to wait out the heat.

ThisisReno.com

An attempted traffic stop on I-80 Friday afternoon led to one man being shot dead and a Washoe County Sheriff's deputy in the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department

A tribute video for the slain police officers in Dallas has gone viral. Our News Director Michelle Billman reports that it features a poem performed by a member of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. Let's take a listen.

Michael Coghlan/CC BY-SA 2.0

Construction is getting started on a new law enforcement center in Churchill County.  As Reno Public Radio's Steve Shadley reports, it will replace the old jail in downtown Fallon late next year.

The existing Churchill County jail and courthouse is 43-years-old.  It was designed to hold only 54 inmates.  But, the new jail will house up to 120 people. County Commission Chairman Pete Olsen says the old jailhouse will be remodeled and later used as a courthouse.

Law Enforcement Grappling With Mental Health Calls

Apr 29, 2016
City of Reno

Last year alone, Reno Police responded to roughly 2,100 suicide calls along with 730 calls for other mental health concerns. Reporter Rocio Hernandez examines how Northern Nevada is grappling with this issue.

Local law enforcement agencies agree one on thing:

"Putting people behind bars doesn't fix mental health," says Washoe County Sheriff Chuck Allen.

Over in Sparks, the police department is implementing crisis intervention training so that every officer can better understand how to deescalate situations without using force.

A Local Take On Solitary Confinement For Minors

Feb 1, 2016
Ken Mayer / FLICKR.CC / ATTRIBUTION 2.0 GENERIC

President Barack Obama recently issued an executive order that bans the use of solitary confinement on juvenile offenders in federal prisons. Reno Public Radio’s Marcus Lavergne got a local expert’s take on this change. 

In most cases, juveniles locked in solitary confinement cells will experience limited contact and long periods without much natural light. This can be for days, weeks or even months.

Armed Oregon Seizure Has Nevada Critics Speaking Out

Jan 8, 2016
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

After a week, there have been no arrests in the armed seizure of a national wildlife refuge in southeastern Oregon being led by two sons of Cliven Bundy.

Bundy is the Bunkerville rancher who refused to pay $1 million in grazing fees last year and called on militia groups to confront land managers.

The occupation of Malheaur National Wildlife Refuge now has several critics across Nevada speaking out, including former U.S. Representative Steven Horsford who says the Bundys are domestic terrorists.

Imagens Evangélicas / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

This week, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas is starting a three-year, $600,000 research project to interview human trafficking victims ages 18 to 24.

Alexis Kennedy is a criminal justice professor at UNLV and will be conducting the interview. She says when victims are identified, they need an extensive web of services even after they age out of the system, including counseling, housing, and mentors.

"You can't live in the traumatic circumstance of being a trafficking victim and then, the second you turn 18, you're a healthy, functioning adult," says Kennedy. "

Reno News & Review

Fatal Encounters is a growing database of information about people killed during their interactions with law enforcement agencies across the country.

The project has gained international attention and been used by reporters at The Guardian, The Washington Post, and other major media outlets.

It’s the brainchild of Brian Burghart, publisher for the Reno News & Review, who joined our News Director Michelle Bliss to give the latest update on his work. 

Testing Rape Kit Backlog Just The First Step

Sep 21, 2015
Lonnie Timmons III / The Plain Dealer

Earlier this month, we learned that Nevada is getting more than $5 million to test its backlog of 7,500 rape kits. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports this is just the first step in a much bigger process.

Testing just one rape kit can cost up to $1,500. That's why so many have been piling up in Nevada for decades. The state now has the money to get rid of its backlog and, once the results are in, law enforcement agencies can start checking that DNA evidence to see if it matches anyone already in their system.

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