Immigration

Camille Stuyvesant

President Donald Trump is calling for an end to “chain migration” along with tighter legal immigration control, but what exactly does that term mean? The misconception is that any immigrant can bring as many family members as they would like when they come to the United States. In actuality, the process is much lengthier, in some cases taking up to 23 years, and is limited to certain family members. Our reporter, Camille Stuyvesant spoke with immigration attorney Sylvia Ontaneda-Bernales to break down 'chain migration.'

1. The Benefactors

Algunos de los diputados de Nevada están respondiendo a los posibles cambios de las leyes federales de inmigración. La reportera Natalie Van Hoozer informa. 

Neftalí Cruz Nicolás

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The deadline for Congress to come to a decision about the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program has come and gone with no clear solution. The 700,000 recipients are living in a continued state of uncertainty. Our reporter Camille Stuyvesant recently spoke with a local DACA recipient about her experiences.

 

 

 

 

Jahahi Mazariego is the UNR Social Services Coordinator and works with the university's undocumented students.
Jolie Ross

When President Donald Trump ordered an end to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, last fall, he told Congress to pass a replacement by March 5, 2018. That did not happen and now those protected by the program could soon be eligible for deportation.

Jacob Solis

 

A bill from Senator Dean Heller is looking to curb gang violence, in part, by making it easier to deport known gang members or immigrants associated with gangs, but not everyone is so sure it's the right move. Reno Public Radio's Jacob Solis spoke to a law professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas to find out more.

And a warning, this interview does contain some graphic details.

 

U.S. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Immigration is all over the news these days, but behind the policies and the politics are countless individuals with unique and compelling stories. Historian Alicia Barber shares the story of an early immigrant to Nevada in this segment of Time & Place.

Some of Nevada’s Congressional leaders are responding to possible changes in federal immigration laws. Reno Public Radio’s Natalie Van Hoozer has the story.

On Friday, the federal government shut down. Part of the reason was that lawmakers were unable to work out a deal on the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program. Among the lawmakers who voted against a spending bill because of the lack of action on DACA, was Nevada’s Democratic Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. She spoke with our political reporter Paul Boger about that vote.

Paul Boger / Reno Public Radio

A district court judge in Carson City has ruled a controversial ballot initiative aimed at banning sanctuary cities in Nevada too confusing to move onto a statewide vote. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

Nevada State Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (right) spoke in the U.S. Senate to ask for support in passing the DREAM Act. She also shared a letter from DACA recipient and Reno resident Maria Toca (pictured in middle photo).
Screenshot from a Facebook video posted by the Facebook account of Senator Catherine Cortez Masto

The legislation for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, is still in a state of uncertainty.

Our reporter Natalie Van Hoozer sat down with our news director Michelle Billman to provide some updates.  

Here are seven things to know.

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