healthcare

For the first time in Northern Nevada, thousands of employees at three Reno casinos have access to an onsite clinic. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray checks out what this type of healthcare looks like.

NPR

The most recent effort by GOP leaders to partially repeal the Affordable Care Act failed to pass this week. For that vote, Republican Senator Dean Heller stuck with his party by supporting the ‘skinny repeal.’ Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores the possible impact of this vote on his political future.

In a dramatic upset, Arizona Senator John McCain and two other Republicans voted no on the skinny repeal.

Reporter Michelle Rindels is with The Nevada Independent. She says Senator Dean Heller won’t have to take heat for sticking with the majority of his party.

A vote on health care legislation is expected Tuesday, but the details are murky. Political scientist Fred Lokken says it's unclear how Republican Senator Dean Heller will vote.

“He is now in the classical ‘damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t’ situation,” Lokken explains, “because if he does not support the state that becomes a huge issue. Frankly, it could play very heavily moving forward in his reelection campaign. If he does stand by his state, he could be targeted by the Trump PAC. A candidate could be put in the primary race to try to beat him for the nomination.”

Updated at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 2017:

Governor Brian Sandoval vetoed Assembly Bill 374.  In response to the veto, Assemblyman Mike Sprinkle, who sponsored the bill posted this statement on his Facebook page:

Nevada’s Second District Congressman, Republican Mark Amodei, has received criticism for his support for the controversial GOP-backed American Heath Care Act. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger sat down with Congressman Amodei to talk about his support of the bill.

"It's not politically sexy," says Amodei. "I didn't make a deal to get my picture taken on Air Force One or get a free public lands bill. It's like, you've taken care of my issue I'll support it."

Noah Glick

After voting last week in favor of the new Republican-backed health care law, Nevada U.S. Congressman Mark Amodei is offering another option for Congress to consider: single-payer health care.

Paul Boger

An effort to renew the GOP’s controversial plan to replace the Affordable Care Act seems to be gaining little traction. Yet, Nevada officials are still worried that any changes to the nation's current health care laws could result in thousands of Nevadans losing their coverage. 

Alexa Ard

Monday marked the first major deadline for lawmakers during the 2017 legislative session in Nevada. Legislators worked late into the evening to introduce personal bills.

Nevada's two Congressional Republicans have been confronted by protestors seeking answers on where they stand on a variety of issues, but most especially the Affordable Care Act, which the GOP has vowed to repeal. However, Nevada's Second District Congressman Mark Amodei says lawmakers need to examine the health care law piece-by-piece and evaluate each issue independently. 

"Wiping the whole thing out and starting over again invites that whole roll-out disaster that we had with the ACA, websties are crashing and all that other sort of stuff," says Amodei.

The KUNR news team recently reported on the physical and mental trauma one Syrian family endured while escaping their war-torn country. In part two of this story, Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports that while federal benefits like Medicaid can help refugees with basic health care, their more complex medical issues can be left untreated.

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