Burning Man 2017

Paul Boger

Over the past several years, Burning Man as an event has faced criticism. Some believe that the festival has moved too far beyond its roots as a place for artists to display their work.  Or where members of the “counterculture” can find support. They argue that it’s become too corporate, a playground for the rich. Others, though, feel like the event is moving in a more sustainable direction.

During the Burning Man Festival, which wrapped this week, a huge temporary city is erected where there are only two things can use money for, ice and coffee. Everything else of value within the city’s limits is gifted, especially food. Paul Boger followed a camp gifting hot food to the denizens of Black Rock City.

The Burning Man Journal

Burning Man 2017 attracted nearly 70,000 people to Northern Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. The event has grown dramatically from its humble beginnings on the shores of the San Francisco Bay 31 years ago.

While out on the windy, dusty playa this year, Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger met with one of the event’s founders, Harley K. DuBois, to learn more about how it all started. 

Paul Boger

The art that's out on the playa in Black Rock City is an integral part of Burning Man. This year, artists from around the world have constructed pieces that run the gamut from large to small, including wood structures, paintings, and more. Our reporter Paul Boger spoke with Anabel Romero from Los Angeles who is part of a crew that has created a large wooden structure called Aluna as well as Harvey Branscomb of Colorado, who helped bring a piece called the Mammoth Art Car to Nevada.

Paul Boger

Two hours north of Reno, smack dab in the middle of the Black Rock Desert, is Burning Man. The week-long festival, which is intended to celebrate art and inclusivity, has also become synonymous with party culture and drug use. But despite its remote location, the event takes place on federal land, with law enforcement required to Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports, 

It’s a hot afternoon on the Playa, the winds have been kicking up large dust devils all day, and many Burners have begun the daily ritual of seeking a shady place to wait out the heat.

Paul Boger

The Burning Man festival in the Black Rock Desert attracts 70,000 people each year. Our reporter Paul Boger is there and took these photos of the artwork on the playa.

Christopher Michel

People from around the globe will descend upon Northern Nevada this weekend to take part in one of the largest arts and cultural events in the country -- Burning Man.

Located about two hours north of Reno in the Black Rock Desert, the festival has become one of the largest cultural events in the nation. And this year it's expected to draw an estimated 70,000 people to Northern Nevada. But what is the impact of the event, and what can we expect to see this year?

Reno Public Radio reached out to the Reno Gazette Journal 's Burning Man Reporter Jenny Kane to get the details