Background checks

Alexa Ard

Last November, Nevada voters approved Question 1, an initiative that requires all private firearm sales and transfers to undergo background checks, including those at gun shows.

But a video taken less than a week after the Las Vegas massacre shows gun sellers at a Reno gun show selling firearms without the required background checks.

Angela Schmeidel Randall / CC BY-SA 2.0

We’re hearing a lot about the Nevada ballot measure to tighten regulations on gun sales. The Kenny Guinn Center for Policy Priorities is a nonpartisan think tank based in Nevada that has provided a detailed fact sheet on the initiative, exploring the pros and cons. Executive Director Nancy Brune spoke with our reporter Bob Conrad to explain their findings.

Alexa Ard

Question 1 on this year’s ballot asks voters whether background checks should be required on private gun sales and transfers, including those done online or at gun shows.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

Everytown For Gun Safety

A recent report found that nearly 9 percent of Nevadans shopping online for a gun from an unlicensed seller—a process that doesn’t require a background check—are actually prohibited from owning one. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

According to a recent report from Everytown for Gun Safety, a group working to end gun violence, unlicensed gun sellers in Nevada are posting nearly 36,000 unique ads on just four websites every year.

Nevada Firearms Coalition

The Background Check Initiative would expand background checks to private gun sales made online and at gun shows. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports that if lawmakers don’t approve the changes this session, voters will have their say in 2016.

This topic arouses passion from both sides. Don Turner has formed a political action committee to fight the Background Check Initiative.

“I’m president of Nevada Firearms Coalition," Turner says. "I’m also president of Nevadans for State Gun Rights.”