Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

Behind The Furious Debate Over GMO Crops

Apr 14, 2016

Genetically engineered crops, commonly called GMOs (genetically modified organisms), trigger lively discussions over the way they are created. For the farmers who grow them, many feel they are a wonder of technology. For those opposed, the plants represent everything they feel is wrong with modern agriculture. Luke Runyon of Here & Now contributor Harvest Public Media explains what people are really arguing about.

How To Make Really Good Pizza At Home

Apr 14, 2016

Americans spend $30 billion a year on take-out pizza. But Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says making pizza at home is cheaper, easier than you might think and tastes great! She joins hosts Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young with samples and these recipes:

In New Zealand, an octopus named Inky has captured the world’s attention with his crafty escape from the National Aquarium. Inky slipped out of his tank, slithered across the floor and disappeared through a drain pipe and into the ocean.

The escape happened three months ago, but only came to light this week. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Roger Hanlon, an octopus expert and senior scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, about Inky and the antics of other octopuses.

Around the world, subway projects are booming. New metros have sprung up or are in the works in Brazil, Saudi Arabia and India, and China announced several years ago that it would build 25 new subway systems. But in the United States, investment in new subways has lagged.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Fred Salvucci, senior lecturer in civil and environmental engineering at MIT and former Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation, about what state and local governments should be doing about transportation for the future.

Billionaire tech entrepreneur Sean Parker, of Napster and Facebook fame, announced today that he’s pouring $250 million into cancer research – specifically to explore immunotherapy treatment, which tries to get the body’s immune system to attack cancer cells.

Another key piece of Parker’s effort is getting several hundred scientists, who are normally in intense competition with one another, to join forces and share research.

A pastor in Patchogue, Long Island has asked the Suffolk County Republican Party to move a Donald Trump fundraiser scheduled for tomorrow. Trump is scheduled to speak at a nightclub on the same street where Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero was killed in a 2008 hate crime. Lucero was beaten to death by seven white teenagers.

Today physicist Stephen Hawking and Russian billionaire Yuri Milner announced the Breakthrough Starshot Project, an initiative to send multiple tiny crafts to the Alpha Centauri star system, some four light-years away.

Could it work, and what could it mean for the future of space exploration? Here & Now’s Robin Young discusses the project with Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

On June 9, California will become the fifth state in the country where it’s legal for terminally ill people to take their own lives with the help of a physician.

Supporters say such aid-in-dying laws save people from needless pain and suffering in their final days and allow them a more dignified death.

Critics worry about people being coaxed into taking their own lives and, more fundamentally, the morality of assisted suicide.

Saul Gonzalez from KCRW in Los Angeles has more.

Two more deaths have been added to the number associated with pneumonia-like Legionnaires’ disease in the Flint area, which has been plagued by tainted water. Meanwhile, calls for the resignation of Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder continue. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks to NPR’s Cheryl Corley and Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody about the latest developments.

The U.S. Masters golf tournament wrapped up this weekend, and the big story wasn’t the winner, Danny Willett. It was 22-year-old Jordan Spieth, who blew a lead in the last half of the round to come in second. Some are calling his bungling of the 12th hole the biggest golf meltdown of all time. Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd speaks to sports psychologist Patrick Cohn about what was going on in Spieth’s mind, and how he could recover.

Interview Highlights: Patrick Cohn

On Jordan Spieth’s 12 hole collapse

Pages