Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

On the same day President Trump signed his new immigration ban, a Twitter account launched to shine the spotlight on what happened to a group of refugees that were turned away from the U.S. in 1939.

About 900 Jewish people had attempted to escape Nazi Germany on the MS St. Louis. But the ship was turned away by the U.S. because of immigration restrictions. Later, more than 250 of those passengers were killed during World War II and the Holocaust.

A meeting in Washington between President Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto was canceled this week after disagreement over who would pay for President Trump’s proposed border wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine are conducting a study of microbial communities inside buildings and how they affect human health. The report is expected to be published later this year.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks to Jordan Peccia (@jordan_peccia), a professor of chemical and environmental engineering at Yale University and one of the scientists involved in the research.

What’s hot in the food world in 2017? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst (@mainecook) checked out a couple of California shows this week and says one major trend is unfamiliar flavors in familiar foods. Gunst and Here & Now‘s Robin Young go through some examples.

Here’s Kathy’s take on some of the products she discovered:

We’re just a few days into the presidency of Donald Trump, and news from his administration is coming out at a seemingly faster-than-ever pace.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR’s David Folkenflik (@davidfolkenflik) about how journalists and news consumers can handle the overwhelming amount of information coming out of the political world this week.

The Mercer County Public Schools in West Virginia are being sued by a mother known as Jane Doe, along with the Freedom From Religion Foundation. The plaintiffs say the school system’s 75-year-old “Bible in the Schools” program violates the First Amendment’s separation between church and state.

At the White House this morning, President Donald Trump told the heads of American auto companies that he wants long-term job creation and “real regulations” that make it easy for companies to do business.

Additionally, Trump has signed executive orders to advance the construction of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines. Trump also said Tuesday morning he’ll announce his pick to fill the Supreme Court vacancy next week.

Earlier this month Here & Now reported on the beating of a white 18 year old with schizophrenia. Many pointed out that his attackers were black, and attributed the incident to racism. But disabilities advocates, and others, saw something else: a very common attack on a vulnerable disabled person.

'La La Land' Leads List Of Oscar Nominees

Jan 24, 2017

The nominees for the 89th Academy Awards were announced Tuesday morning. The musical “La La Land” was the big winner, picking up 14 nominations, tying with “Titanic” and “All About Eve” for the most nominations ever.

What Are 'Alternative Facts?' Not Facts

Jan 23, 2017

President Donald Trump’s senior adviser, Kellyanne Conway, told NBC News on Sunday that the White House had presented “alternative facts” to the ones reported by a number of news organizations regarding the size of the inauguration crowd.

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