Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

Two black men have been shot and killed in the past two days by police officers. Both shootings were captured on video.

An open letter from New York Observer entertainment writer Dana Schwartz to Jared Kushner — owner of the company that publishes The Observer — and Donald Trump’s Jewish son-in-law sparked controversy this week. The letter referred to an illustration that Trump tweeted on Monday that many people viewed as anti-Semitic.

Also, Gretchen Carlson, a former Fox News Channel host, filed a lawsuit accusing Roger Ailes — the network’s powerful chairman and CEO — of sexual harassment.

Linda Lester Keale hosts a show on Kauai Community Radio that showcases traditional Hawaian music. She plays some examples for Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson in today’s DJ Session.

Hear previous installments of Here & Now‘s DJ Sessions

Author and teacher Jewell Parker Rhodes‘ new book “Towers Falling” was inspired by teachers she met in Brooklyn who saw the events of 9/11 from their classrooms, and now 16 years later, are meeting kids who don’t know anything about that day, and they themselves don’t know how to teach it.

Jewell takes a fictional group of kids through class lessons. She talks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about her hope that it will be used in classrooms everywhere.

A survey of Britain’s Creative Industries Federation showed that 96 percent if its members favored remaining in the European Union. So now that U.K. voters have decided to leave, how are British cultural institutions responding?

Robin Young talks to Alistair Spalding, chief executive and artistic director of the famed Sadler’s Well’s Theater in London, which calls itself the world’s top venue for dance.

Financial markets in the U.S. are beginning to rebound from Brexit shock. The three major indexes have gained back more than half of their losses since the vote last week. In Europe, stocks and the value of the pound have also been gaining, after a dramatic plunge last week that many feared could touch off a global financial crisis.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Suskind’s best-selling book, “Life Animated, A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism,” tells the story of how he and his family discovered that Disney films were a way to communicate with his son Owen, who has autism.

In early May, Uber and Lyft stopped operating in Austin, Texas, after the city voted against allowing the ride share companies to use their own background check systems for drivers rather than adopt the fingerprint background checks required for taxi drivers.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Ryan Holiday, editor at large of New York Observer, about how Uber and Lyft’s departure has affected Austin so far.

Do Traffic Classes Lead To Better Drivers?

Jun 29, 2016

South Florida drivers have a reputation for driving fast.

Last year, almost 800,000 people in Florida were pulled over for speeding, as did Wilson Sayre from Here & Now contributor WLRN in Miami. She reports on whether the traffic classes that many ticketed drivers take actually makes them better drivers.

Read more on this story via WLRN

Sixty years ago today, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal Highway Act of 1956. It marked the birth of the interstate highway system, now a 47,000-mile network designed to ease crowded, crumbling roads in post-war America.

At the time, it was sold as one of the most ambitious public works projects ever, but six decades later, many interstates are overcrowded and under maintained. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with William Wilkins of The Road Information Program.

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