Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

The United Nations declared 2017 the International Year of Sustainable Tourism — just in time for the Adventure Junky travel app. Part environmental guide, part social planner, the app offers sustainability-minded adventurers the tools to find off-the-beaten-path travel experiences, or to revel in those experienced by others.

During a White House press briefing Tuesday, Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders used a familiar tactic when she criticized the news media for producing a “constant barrage of fake news.” The criticism prompted Brian Karem, executive editor of the Montgomery County Sentinel, to interrupt Huckabee Sanders and accuse her of continually trying to undermine the media.

When hair falls on the floor during a haircut, it’s typically swept up and thrown into the trash. But a couple of salons in Nashville are seeking a more useful afterlife for hair clippings.

Amy Eskind of Here & Now contributor Nashville Public Radio reports on the unlikely recycling effort.

Living With Zika: One Mother's Story

Jun 27, 2017

Summer is here and with the heat comes the threat of mosquitoes and the diseases they can spread, like the Zika virus. There are currently 80 infants in the mainland U.S. with birth defects caused by Zika, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. health system is at the very beginning of learning how to care for those babies.

It’s an intriguing tale of secrets, class and motherhood. “Leaving Lucy Pear” tells the story of a baby who is abandoned under a pear tree in Gloucester, Massachusetts, by her Jewish 18-year-old mother. Bea hopes that an Irish family who steals the fruit in the dark of night will take the infant and raise her as their own.

A Pentagon memo obtained by The Washington Post suggests that some foreign-born U.S. military recruits, who are not yet citizens, could face deportation. The memo describes “potential security threats” of the immigrants who were recruited under a program that fast-tracks citizenship.

'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli's Trial Begins

Jun 26, 2017

Former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli goes on trial starting Monday for federal securities fraud. Shkreli, who became known as “pharma bro,” came under widespread criticism for upping the price of the lifesaving drug Daraprim 5,000 percent. He is going on trial for something unrelated — prosecutors say that he operated a Ponzi-like scheme at two companies he ran.

This week, President Trump will combine his three roles — president, businessman and politician — into one event at the Trump Hotel in Washington. At an expensive fundraiser for his 2020 re-election, he not only will rake in cash for his campaign, but also run up a huge pile of revenues for his business. His latest financial disclosure suggests that it is lucrative for him to spend time at his own properties.

The U.S. took in more than 96,000 refugees last year, and many were children. Some of those children are finishing their first year in American schools.

Diane Orson from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports on an after-school arts program that’s partnered with a local resettlement agency to create a special violin class for some of the 270 young refugees living in New Haven, Connecticut.

A Slow And Steady Approach To Chemotherapy

Jun 22, 2017

When doctors treat cancer with chemotherapy, they usually attack the tumor as aggressively as the patient can bear. Then, after a break, they do it again. And again.

But that hard-hitting chemo tactic can have a downside: a few resistant cancer cells may survive, and the cancer can come back.

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