Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
538ccf095741593545b41578|536cd4f8e1c870334b229c86

Pages

NPR Story
12:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

School Starts In Donetsk Amidst Shelling

The fighting between Ukrainian forces and the pro-Russian separatists who claim Donetsk as one of their strongholds delayed the start of the school year there.

However, as school was opening Wednesday morning, shells hit a school playground, killing at least ten people.

None of those who died were students because they had already gone inside the school building.

The BBC's James Coomarasamy, who was visiting another school at the time, reports.

Reporter

Read more
NPR Story
12:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

Brighten Up Lunch With Kathy Gunst

A perfectly delicious lunch by Kathy Gunst: "green goddess" salad dressing, a thermos of soup, home made ginger ale and zucchini bread sandwich. (Qainat Khan/Here & Now)

Originally published on Fri October 3, 2014 2:46 pm

Running out of ideas for lunch? Here & Now Resident Chef Kathy Gunst joins Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young in the studio with tips and recipes — from soups and sandwiches to drinks — to brighten up the midday meal.

Read more
NPR Story
12:51 pm
Fri October 3, 2014

District Profile: Two Republicans Face Off In Washington's Fourth

Dan Newhouse (L) and Clint Didier will face each other in Washington's fourth district, even though both are Republicans. (Weldon Wilson / Office of the Governor of Washington State; Clint Didier campaign)

In Washington’s fourth Congressional district, farmer Clint Didier will face state legislator Dan Newhouse in November.

Both are Republicans, but because of a quirk in Washington’s law, the two top vote-getters in the primary election run in the general election.

Northwest Public Radio‘s Rowan Moore Gerety joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the race.

Read more
NPR Story
1:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Dean Of Boston Sports Journalism Celebrates 42 Years On The Job

Jonny Miller and Robin Young (Robin Young)

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 1:04 pm

One of the most-beloved sportscasters you’ve probably never heard of is Jonny Miller.

He’s covered professional sports in Boston for 42 years for CBS powerhouse, WBZ Radio.

He’s called the Helen Thomas of the local sports press corps, because he always gets to ask the first questions.

And he’s earned the respect of players and sports writers, because he does it all, while living with cerebral palsy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young profiles Miller and his long career.

Read more
NPR Story
1:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Business Roundup: From Stocks To The Dollar

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 25, 2014 in New York City. US stocks saw their biggest downturn since July. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

U.S. stocks posted their biggest one-day drop since late July, amid concerns about global growth.

China is signaling it won’t undertake more aggressive stimulus measures and Europe’s economy is showing more signs of sluggishness.

Bloomberg News’ Michael Regan speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the shift.

Read more
NPR Story
1:07 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

After Huge Debut, A Tough Week For Apple

In this photo taken on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014, people wait to buy the new Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices outside an Apple store in Hong Kong. The Apple's new devices were released on Friday in Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and Japan. (Vincent Yu/AP)

It started out so well.

Thousands — no millions — of people lining up to buy the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus.

On Monday, Apple made an announcement: More than 10 million phones sold. A company record.

The new phones are bigger than previous generations; the 6 plus sports a 5 1/2 inch screen.

But that was part of the problem.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

The Lawyer Who Would 'Stop At Nothing To Win'

Lawyer Steven Donziger, left, walks with his clients who are members of Ecuador's indigenous Cofan tribe to Federal Court in New York for their hearing with lawyers for Texaco Monday, Feb. 1, 1999. The Ecuadorian rainforest was polluted by Texaco oil drilling. (Adam Nadel/AP)

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 3:43 pm

Bloomberg Businessweek senior writer Paul Barrett chronicles the 20 year long legal battle waged by human rights lawyer Steven Donziger in the book, “Law of the Jungle: The $19 Billion Legal Battle Over Oil in the Rain Forest and the Lawyer Who’d Stop at Nothing to Win It.

Donziger won compensation for Ecuadorian tribes whose land was polluted by Texaco oil drilling, but he then lost everything when the oil company sued him for dirty tactics.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

How To Translate Good Science Into Good Copy

Physicist Christina Love talks about her PhD thesis on dark matter at the Chemical Heritage Foundation in Center City Philadelphia. She organized the event called "Start Talking Science"(Susan Philllips/WHYY)

The chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, told delegates at the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Summit in New York today that the IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report – compiled by hundreds of scientists – had three key findings:

One: Human influence on the climate is clear and growing.

Two: Quick and decisive action is needed to avoid destructive outcomes.

Three: There are means to limit climate change. That language is pretty simple and clear.

Read more
NPR Story
12:41 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

What Will Be The Impact Of New Inversion Rules?

The Treasury Department has issued new rules governing corporate inversions after calls from President Barack Obama for "corporate patriotism." Obama is pictured here walking with Treasury Secretary Jack Lew (who was at the time the White House Cheif of Staff) on March 2, 2012. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Following through on a populist appeal from President Barack Obama for a new era of “corporate patriotism,” the Treasury Department stepped in Monday with new regulations designed to limit the ability of U.S. firms to seek refuge in lower tax countries.

The Treasury will make these so-called corporate inversions less lucrative by barring creative techniques that companies use to lower their tax bill. Additionally, the U.S. will make it harder for companies to move overseas in the first place by tightening the ownership requirements they must meet.

Read more
NPR Story
1:52 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

Terry Gilliam Goes Back To The Dystopian Future

Director Terry Gilliam (R) on the set of his new film, "The Zero Theorem." (Amplify)

In the new film “The Zero Theorem,” director Terry Gilliam gives us a dystopian yet fantastically colored and absurd future that will seem very familiar to fans of his films “Brazil” and “Twelve Monkeys.”

That’s no accident, Gilliam tells Here & Now’s Robin Young.

When he first read screenwriter Pat Rushin’s script, it was clear that Rushin had seen every film he’d made.

Read more

Pages