Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

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More and more people are putting themselves and wild animals in danger, all in the name of a cool selfie. The trend of taking exciting selfies and videos has resulted in injured animals and animal harassment charges for the humans involved.

Vicki Croke, host of WBUR’s The Wild Life blog joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to talk about the abuse of animals in pursuit of a good selfie.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Julia Turner, editor-in-chief of Slate, about what’s trending on social media.

The California State Assembly has passed a bill that would require all children – except for those with medical wavers – to receive vaccinations before attending school. Current law allows for personal belief exemptions.

Many California parents choose not to vaccinate their children out of fear that it will cause autism or other medical problems, but medical professionals assert that there is no risk of such side effects.

Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev apologized for the deadly attack for the first time Wednesday just before a judge was set to formally sentence him to death.

“I am sorry for the lives that I’ve taken, for the suffering that I’ve caused you, for the damage that I’ve done – irreparable damage,” the 21-year-old college student said, breaking more than two years of public silence.

To the victims, he said: “I pray for your relief, for your healing.”

The Supreme Court is scheduled to rule on two landmark cases in the next few days – same-sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act. Advocates and critics of the death penalty are also watching for a ruling on the constitutionality of some lethal injection drugs.

But why do all these big cases come at the same time? What goes on behind the scenes of the Supreme Court as a session winds down? Here & Now’s Robin Young asks NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.

As politicians across the South are stepping in to call for the removal of the Confederate battle flag and other symbols of the Confederacy, big businesses are also joining the fray. Wal-Mart, eBay, Amazon and others have promised to pull merchandise tied to the flag, in some cases adding strong arguments against the products.

Of all the ingredients she uses in her dishes, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst prizes garlic above all. “Garlic is the spine of all my cooking. I cannot imagine cooking without it,” she told host Robin Young.

Kathy gave us this primer on garlic scapes, green garlic and roasted garlic. She also brought us these four recipes:

As NATO defense ministers gather for a meeting in Brussels tomorrow, they face a central question: Just how serious is the threat from Russia? Some say they have much bigger problems than Vladimir Putin, but others fear the Kremlin is growing dangerously hostile.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide whether or not states have the constitutional right to ban same-sex marriage. Whichever way the court goes, this ruling could create a murky legal situation for several states that allow same sex marriage, as well as several states that prohibit it.

It has been six days since nine people were shot and killed at Emanual AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina. The shooting has ignited a debate about the Confederate flag, which still flies at the statehouse in South Carolina, while the state and American flags are at half-mast.

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