Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd sits down with Seth and Scott Avett of The Avett Brothers to talk about a new film about the making of the band’s Grammy-nominated album, “True Sadness.”

That film, “May It Last,” comes out today and is in theaters for one night only.

Experiencing Irma In Naples, Fort Myers

Sep 11, 2017

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets two updates from Florida assessing the situation as Irma — now a tropical storm — moves through the state. She speaks with Randy Henderson, the mayor of Fort Myers, Florida, about how the storm has affected the city, and Ed Laudise, assistant principal of a school in Naples, where people were sheltered as Irma passed overhead.

At the White House and the Pentagon Monday morning, the president and first lady observed the 16th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

NPR’s Ron Elving (@NPRrelving) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss President Trump’s remarks, and also to look ahead to the week in politics.

Hurricane Irma hit hard in Turks and Caicos early Friday, knocking out all communications with the islands. Earlier this week the storm destroyed most of Barbuda and wreaked havoc on St. Martin and St. Barts.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Hugh Riley, secretary general of the Caribbean Tourism Organization, a development agency representing all 28 Caribbean countries. Riley is in Antigua, where he arrived Thursday night as part of an emergency response team.

Each summer, around 600 Mexican women come to Hooper’s Island in Maryland under the H-2B visa program to do jobs their employers say Americans don’t want.

Armando Trull (@trulldc) of WAMU reports that for more than two decades, the women have helped keep the iconic seafood alive.

Many of Evelin Salgado’s students at Cane Ridge High School in Nashville are DACA recipients, able to work, drive and enroll in college thanks to the Deferred Action Childhood Arrivals program.

Florida Keys residents are beginning to make the 113-mile journey on the Overseas Highway to the mainland, ahead of Hurricane Irma.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with WLRN’s Nancy Klingener (@keywestnan), who is on Key West.

As Hurricane Irma brings devastating winds closer to the mainland United States, the 6 million people who live in South Florida are preparing for the worst. Broward County, which includes Fort Lauderdale, on Thursday issued an evacuation order for people living east of U.S. Route 1.

In the aftermath of Harvey and with Hurricane Irma gaining strength in the Atlantic, people need essential items when they evacuate from their homes: medications, clothing and, for some families, diapers.

Courtney Collins (@courtneylc82) of KERA in Dallas reports that shelters are making sure they’re well-stocked.

President Trump overruled congressional Republicans and his own treasury secretary Wednesday and cut a deal with Democrats to fund the government and raise the federal borrowing limit for three months, all part of an agreement to speed money to Harvey relief.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR).

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