Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

The cost of investing in some basic stock funds is falling, as firms try to attract new customers, many of whom are younger and skeptical of paying hefty fees. According to Morningstar, the number of funds that cost $10 or less for every $10,000 invested has more than doubled in recent years, from 40 in 2010, to more than 100 today. This puts pressure on companies to make money elsewhere. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain.

It’s been a mixed bag for retail so far this year, with announcements from Macy’s and Wal-Mart of store closings, while online shopping numbers continue to tick up. As the market finds its balance, some customers have fewer and fewer options when it comes to shopping.

Neil Saunders, managing director of the retail research firm Conlumino, talks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about why some parts of the U.S. might become “retail deserts.”

In Washington D.C., one of the places to find movers and shakers is The Bombay Club, a block from the White House. For nearly 30 years at The Bombay Club, turbaned waiters with white gloves have been serving refined Indian dishes to presidents, as well as tourists, long before Indian food became popular in the U.S.

Across the nation, hospitals are paying fines to the government when patients are readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. That can cost medical centers millions and doctors are looking for ways to reduce that readmission rate.

As Casey Kuhn from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports, one rural city in Arizona has kept patients out of the hospital by sending paramedics to their homes.

When the sanctions on Iran were lifted earlier this month, as a result of the nuclear deal, we also got news that four Americans would be released from Iran, as part of a prisoner swap. Separate from that swap, another American, Matthew Trevithick, was being released.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is now investigating the NFL over its ticketing practices – specifically, whether it is illegally pricing tickets on the resale market using a mechanism known as “resale price floors.” Bloomberg has been covering the story, and Mike Regan of Bloomberg joins Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd with details.

Avoid Tax Identity Theft By Filing Early

Jan 28, 2016

Another reason to dread tax season: the Internal Revenue Service says it paid out $63 billion in fraudulent tax refunds between 2011 and 2014. That means someone posing as you could walk away with a refund check with your name on it.

Shawn Novak teaches tax policy at Arizona State University. He’s also a former tax adviser for the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. He joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to discuss the problem, and ways to avoid becoming a victim.

Acorn TV Streams Shows From Abroad

Jan 27, 2016

After the acclaimed period drama “Downton Abbey” wraps up its final season, what new shows can Anglophiles latch onto? The Acorn TV streaming service brings beloved British programs, along with productions from Canada, Australia and New Zealand, to subscribers’ devices. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans speaks to Here & Now's Robin Young about Acorn TV's roots and growing popularity.

Guest

Authorities say the armed group occupying the national wildlife preserve in Oregon was given “ample opportunity” to leave peacefully.

Greg Bretzing, the FBI’s Portland special agent in charge, said at a news conference Wednesday that authorities took a deliberate and measured response to those who took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 2. He says they’re working to safely remove those who are still occupying the site.

With U.S. stocks off to a dismal start in 2016 and China’s economic growth slowing, Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with Harvard economist Larry Summers. Summers says there’s a 1 in 3 chance the U.S. is heading for a recession. He also says he’s supporting Hillary Clinton for the presidency.

Interview Highlights: Larry Summers

Are you worried about the volatility of the stock market and the direction of the U.S. economy?

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