Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

The extent of the damage caused by Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean is still coming into view. On St. John, many residents remain without power and officials fear the fresh water supply is low.

But the devastation may be even worse on St. Thomas, where aid has been slowed by destroyed infrastructure. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with NPR’s Jason Beaubien (@jasonbnpr), who is in St. Thomas.

A musical based on the songs of 1970s singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg has launched in Nashville. It’s called “Part of the Plan.”

Amy Eskind of Nashville Public Radio spoke with its LA producers about why they created the show, and chose Nashville for the opening.

As ISIS loses territory in Iraq and Syria, authorities in Europe fear that people who left to fight for the group will return to Europe and carry out attacks across the continent. There have already been examples of that in recent months.

The mayor of Baltimore says she has no plans to remove the city’s monument to Francis Scott Key, after the words “racist anthem” were sprayed this week on a statue of him. Key wrote what would become the national anthem 205 years ago today while he was held captive on a British ship during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812.

Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli, infamous for price gouging and currently awaiting sentencing for a fraud conviction, has been sent back to jail. Shkreli had his bail revoked after he took to Facebook this week, posting that he would offer $5,000 to anyone able to obtain a hair from Hillary Clinton. Clinton is touring publicly to promote her new book.

Long-term care facilities across Florida are being evaluated as police investigate the deaths of eight elderly people who died in a nursing home after Hurricane Irma. The storm has knocked out power at a time of sweltering heat.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Associated Press reporter Terry Spencer (@terryspen) for the latest.

Bitcoin's Uncertain Future

Sep 13, 2017

JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon took another shot at Bitcoin this week, calling it a fraud and saying the market will eventually blow up. And late last week, state-owned media in China reported that Beijing plans to ban all cryptocurrency exchanges.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks about Bitcoin’s future with Jason Bellini (@jasonbellini) of The Wall Street Journal.

Two recent studies have found strong evidence that intestinal bacteria play a role in multiple sclerosis, an incurable autoimmune disease. The studies advance our understanding of how the microbiome is linked to multiple sclerosis and what potential treatments or prevention methods might be developed for the disease.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti talks with Sharon Begley (@sxbegle) of our partners at STAT about what the findings mean.

One of the coastal cities in Florida inundated with historic flooding after Irma was Jacksonville. The flooding was so severe in some places on Monday that the sheriff’s department said it had to rescue more than 350 people.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks to WJCT reporter Ryan Benk (@RyanMichaelBenk), who’s on the scene.

Airports across Florida are reopening Tuesday following closures due to Hurricane Irma. In order to get up and running again, airlines face many logistical hurdles in terms of getting equipment and workers where they need to be.

Plus, airlines have to look at the long-term losses that might come from hurricane damage. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Seth Kaplan of Airline Weekly.

Pages