Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

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The continuing flow into the U.S. of Central American families and youth fleeing violence has prompted the Obama administration to expand an asylum program that protects some of these migrants.

The move is getting mixed reviews in the Washington area, home to thousands of Salvadorans. And as Armando Trull from Here & Now contributor WAMU reports, the changes come too late for one Maryland father.

One of the Republicans who is calling on Donald Trump to abandon his presidential bid is Rep. Will Hurd, a Republican who represents Texas’s 23rd congressional district. Hurd is also facing a tough race for re-election against Democrat Pete Gallego.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Aaron Schrank of Texas Public Radio about the race.

Britain's Pound Hits Historic Lows

Oct 12, 2016

The British pound hit a historic low Tuesday, touching a worth of $1.20, down from $1.55 last year.

The drop was brought on by continuing fears about Britain’s impending exit from the European Union.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sebastian Payne of the Financial Times about the drop, and the latest in the Brexit negotiations.

Samsung is permanently ending production of its signature Galaxy Note 7 after more reports of the smartphone catching fire.

The electronics giant previously called on carriers to stop selling the phone, but now it says it will take more drastic steps while it investigates the problem. The move leaves Samsung without a high-end model to rival Apple’s iPhone 7, and may cause headaches for millions of customers.

It can be tricky to determine, with any certainty, where the candidates stand on the issues, including on issues of science.

That’s why, for the second presidential election cycle in a row, Scientific American magazine has partnered with to pose 20 questions to the candidates — questions that were developed and refined by dozens of scientific organizations that represent more than 10 million scientists.

The 2005 video of an offensive and lewd conversation between Donald Trump and Access Hollywood’s then-host Billy Bush stirred outrage and several endorsement reversals.

It has also presented some tricky questions for NBC, which announced it is suspending Billy Bush from his current position as anchor on the “Today” show.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik about how the scandal is playing out for the media company and its staff.

U.S. employers added 156,000 jobs in September, less than expected, and unemployment rose to 5 percent, from 4.9 percent, according to today’s Labor Department report.

Jobs growth has averaged 178,000 a month so far this year, down from last year’s pace of 229,000.

But there was positive news in wages — the average hourly earnings increased 0.2 percent over August, and were up 2.6 percent over September 2015.

Hurricane Matthew lashed Haiti, leaving the country with damaged infrastructure and hundreds dead.

In addition to physical damage, the island now faces health risks, the displacement of thousands and a logistical nightmare as its people try to rebuild their lives.

The 1831 Southampton Insurrection, or Nat Turner’s Rebellion, is the subject of the new film “The Birth of a Nation.”

The film tells the story of Turner, an African-American born into slavery. He was taught to read and eventually became a preacher to fellow slaves. In August 1831 he led an uprising of slaves against their white oppressors. While some view Turner as a hero, others question his heroism because of the number of women and children who were victims of the deadly rebellion.

Who Is The New U.N. Secretary-General?

Oct 6, 2016

The United Nations Security Council today approved Portugal’s former prime minister Antonio Guterres as the next U.N. secretary-general, replacing Ban Ki Moon.

Guterres served 10 years as the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, a role he believes has prepared him to serves as secretary general.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Michael Doyle, a former U.N. assistant secretary-general, about Guterres and the role he will play on the world stage.

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