Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

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NPR Story
11:32 am
Mon March 23, 2015

Redesigned PSAT Shifts Preparation Efforts For High School Students

Students taking the PSAT in the fall of 2015 will see a newly designed test. (Sam UL/Flickr Creative Commons)

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 12:02 pm

It’s that time of year: the high school class of 2015 is now receiving college decision letters.

At the same time, current high school freshmen and sophomores will face a revised version of the preliminary SAT or PSAT in the fall of 2015.

The PSAT is an important step before taking the actual SAT but the announced changes may change the way students go about preparing.

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NPR Story
11:32 am
Mon March 23, 2015

China's Top Weather Official Warns Of Climate Change Risks

A man wears a mask amid heavy smog on the Bund in Shanghai on November 12, 2014. (AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 12:02 pm

China’s top weather official is warning people about the potential impact of climate change.

China’s Xinhua news agency reports that Zheng Guoguang, chief of China’s Meteorological Administration, said climate change could reduce crop yields and lead to “ecological degradation.”

The statements are considered rare, even though China is the world’s largest source of carbon dioxide emissions.

“As the world warms, risks of climate change and climate disasters to China could become more grave,” Zheng said.

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NPR Story
12:19 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

From Texas, A Supreme Court Case For Confederate Flag License Plates

This image provided by the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles shows the design of a proposed Sons of Confederate Veterans license plate. . (Texas Department of Motor Vehicles via AP)

There are more than 300 specialty plates in Texas, paying tribute to things like wild turkeys, Dr. Pepper and the fight against terrorism.

But when one group submitted a plate design with their logo — a Confederate flag — it was rejected by Texas officials. On Monday, the constitutionality of that rejection will be considered by the Supreme Court.

At issue is whether the license plates constitute government speech or an individual’s private speech.

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NPR Story
12:19 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

Local Sports Become Lucrative Market

Regional sports broadcasters have become a big source of revenue for local teams. Pictured, the Arizona Diamondbacks play a game against the Oakland Athletics on March 10, 2015 in Mesa, Arizona. (Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

If you’ve been watching March Madness, you’ve probably been watching on CBS, TNT, TBS or Tru-TV. Those networks have the TV rights to the games until 2024.

But if you’re a local sports fan, chances are you do a lot of your sports TV viewing on regional sports networks.

Those networks have become an important source of revenue for the teams whose games they broadcast, and if you pay for cable — you’re probably paying more for your regional sports network than almost any other channel.

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NPR Story
12:19 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

People Fleeing Islamic State-Controlled Areas Flood Baghdad

Baghdad’s neighborhoods are home to increasing numbers of people who have fled areas controlled by the so-called Islamic State militants.

Many of those displaced come from Anbar province, west of Baghdad. They need aid, and it’s a struggle for the government and international community to get it to them, as the BBC’s Ahmed Maher reports from Baghdad.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

Protests Breakout At University of Virginia After Violent Arrest

UVA students protest the bloody arrest of a junior by Virginia police officers. (Hawes Spencer/WVTF)

Photos of University of Virginia student Martese Johnson laying on the ground with a bleeding head and police holding his hands behind his back have led to protest on the university’s campus.

Johnson, a third year honor student, was taken in to custody yesterday in front of a bar near the university. Video of him yelling “how did this happen” and calling the arresting Alcohol and Beverage Control officers racists, has prompted the university president to request an administrative review of the incident.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

2,000 Snow Geese Die In Idaho

2,000 snow geese in Idaho died this month as a result of avian cholera. (hjhipster/Flickr)

Wildlife experts say avian cholera is responsible for a mass die-off of snow geese in Idaho this month, which left 2,000 of the migratory birds dead. Wildlife officials say they are taking precautions so that it doesn’t spread.

Jeff Knetter, a waterfowl biologist with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game tells Here & Now’s Robin Young about how spectacular it is when tens of thousands of snow geese at once take off in flight.

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NPR Story
12:38 pm
Thu March 19, 2015

DJ Sessions: Sam Cooke Fans - Listen Up

KCRW's Aaron Byrd says Sam Cooke fans might really enjoy Leon Bridges. (Leon Bridges/Facebook)

Aaron Byrd of KCRW in Santa Monica has a lot of new music to share with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, including an artist that Sam Cooke fans will want to hear — he’s talking about Leon Bridges.

Byrd also shares music from the Los Angeles artist Kelela and disco-funk group Tuxedo — which has a less explicit take on a Snoop Dogg classic.

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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Midwest States Push To Legalize Raw Milk

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control warns that one sip of unpasteurized milk can cause serious illness because it’s a fertile breeding ground for harmful germs like salmonella and e. coli. (Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media)

Federal health officials say drinking unpasteurized raw milk is unsafe and poses a threat to public health.

But, raw milk is gaining popularity in some circles, so several Midwest states are actually looking to legalize the sale of raw milk in order to regulate it.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Harvest Public Media’s Abby Wendle has more about the push to legalize raw milk.

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NPR Story
12:13 pm
Wed March 18, 2015

Changing The Conversation With #IAmAStatistic

(L-R) Neil Osborne, Max Tilus,Tyler Holness, and Jack McGoldrick are behind "Statistic" -- to change the conversation about African-American men. (Robin Lubbock/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu March 19, 2015 9:19 pm

Over the past few months, a light has been shined on the African-American man’s experience, especially in relation to law enforcement.

Throughout the conversation, much attention has been given to statistics: how many African-American men go to jail, graduate high school and go to college.

Many of these statistics reflect African-American men’s experiences in a negative light, but what if the statistics focused on their positive accomplishments?

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