Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways To Connect

Update 2:23 p.m.: Franklin County Sheriff Bill Overton says the suspect in the shooting has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police say that as they were pursuing the suspect in an on-air fatal shooting, he ran off the road and crashed, and was found suffering from a gunshot wound.

Virginia State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said Wednesday that the suspect is being treated for life-threatening injuries.

Mount Everest Reopened To Climbers

Aug 26, 2015

Japanese mountaineer Nobukazu Kuriki is heading up Everest. This week he became the first person granted a permit to climb the mountain since a 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated much of Nepal in April.

After four attempts, Kuriki hopes to reach the top. He also says he hopes to send a message that the mountain is safe for climbers.

Seven-time summiter Peter Athans says Nepal needs tourists now more than ever. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

For decades, sandwiches have been the go-to food for picnics and school lunches. In the 1950’s, various trade organizations declared August to be National Sandwich Month. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares a few of her favorites with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson.

As we mark the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated the Gulf Coast and killed more than 1,800 people in August of 2005, Here & Now listens back to some of the memorable moments from the storm and the news coverage.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Napa Valley Wine Train is facing backlash, after members of women’s book club said they were kicked off the train over the weekend because of their race. All but one of the 11 book club members kicked off the train was African-American. The train company says the group was being too noisy. Danielle Belton of The Root discusses the story with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that most U.S. middle and high schools start the school day too early, before 8:30 a.m.

Lead author Dr. Anne Wheaton says if teens don’t get enough sleep, they are more prone to not getting enough exercise and engaging in risky behavior like drinking alcohol. She cites a recommendation from the National Sleep Foundation that 14 to 17-year-olds need eight to 10 hours of sleep a night.

What makes American music “American”? The answer depends on who you ask.

Guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. was born in Los Angeles to two immigrants, the British-Gibraltarian musician Albert Hammond and Argentine model Claudia Fernández. When he was 18, he moved to New York City to form what would become the hugely successful band The Strokes.

A pioneering mushroom scientist and a bee expert have teamed up to help fight against a disease-carrying killer of the honeybee called the varroa mite. The scientists’ weapon of choice: mushrooms. They believe a special fungus mixture they’re working on may be able to kill parasites without harming bees. Ken Christensen of Here & Now contributor EarthFix went into the field with the scientists and reports.

Akron Loves Devo

Aug 21, 2015

A life-sized photo of the new wave band Devo was mounted over an abandoned storefront in downtown Akron, Ohio, this past week. The picture was taken in 1978, and features the band dressed in yellow hazmat suits.

This piece of public art is designed to capture the moment the band made the leap from hometown heroes to worldwide fame. From the Here & Now contributors network, David C. Barnett of WCPN brings us the story of Devo’s Rust Belt roots.

As the nation approaches the 10-year anniversary of the destruction from Hurricane Katrina, it’s worth remembering that while New Orleans felt the eye of the storm, Katrina also left 238 people dead in Mississippi, and destroyed 230,000 homes in that state.

How did the Mississippi Gulf Coast recover after such devastation, and what lingering issues still remain? Evelina Burnett of Mississippi Public Broadcasting discusses this with Here & Now’s Peter O’Dowd.

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