Here and Now

Monday - Thursday 11am-1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.

Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Here & Now began at WBUR in 1997, and expanded to two hours in partnership with NPR in 2013. Today, the show reaches an estimated 3.6 million weekly listeners on over 383 stations across the country.

To visit the show's website, click here.

KUNR Local Hosts: Esther Ciammachilli, Danna O'Connor

Ways to Connect

The Science Behind Fasting

Nov 25, 2016

Had enough food over Thanksgiving? If you are lucky enough to feel sated, perhaps some fasting is in order.

More and more people are turning to fasting. But does it work, and how safe is it?

Home, Thanksgiving and football.

For many American families, those three things are being celebrated this week, in varying degrees. But it hasn’t always been that way.

Karen Given (@klgiven) from NPR’s Only A Game explains the history of the connection between football and Turkey Day.

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team has announced that he intends to appoint Elisabeth “Betsy” DeVos as the secretary of education.

DeVos is a philanthropist from West Michigan and the head of the group American Federation for Children, a conservative think tank focused on education.

NPR’s Eric Westervelt (@Ericnpr) joins Here & Now to discuss.

Rodale Inc. was founded in 1930, and since then has become one of the largest independent publishers in the country. It puts out a number of magazines, and also works to spread the gospel of an organic lifestyle.

Five years ago, when he was 37 years old, the unthinkable happened to Will Lautzenheiser. He lost both arms and both legs to a devastating bacterial infection.

But then two years ago, Lautzenheiser got what he calls an incredible gift: a double arm transplant.

Those two years have been full of daily hospital visits, and hours and hours of hard, tedious work, to get the arms working. But now, Will can turn a doorknob, feed himself, write with a pen and feel the rain on his hands.

The New York Times reports that during Donald Trump’s meeting with paper’s editorial board, the president-elect was asked about the white nationalist group known as the National Policy Institute. That group held a conference blocks from the White House this past weekend, in which attendees made “Sieg Heil” Nazi salutes.

What comes to mind when you think of food native to the U.S.? For many people it’s soda, hamburgers and hot dogs.

But think back further to a time when Native Americans were the country’s sole inhabitants, and there was no European influence on food.

Robert Zemeckis won an Oscar for directing “Forrest Gump.” He’s also the creative force behind the hugely successful “Back to the Future” films.

This week, Zemeckis’s latest movie “Allied” opens in theaters nationwide. It’s a romantic thriller set in World War II, starring Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard.

Zemeckis joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to talk about the film, and his celebrated career.

Here’s a trailer for the film:

[Youtube]

Cyber Monday may be moving in on Black Friday this year.

Wal-Mart is moving up its Cyber Week deals to Black Friday, a day that is normally dedicated to in-store deals. Meanwhile, Macy’s will kick off its Black Friday sales an hour earlier this year, opening at 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day.

Big City Rats And How To Get Rid Of Them

Nov 21, 2016

Many U.S. cities have a rat problem. Besides freaking most people out, the rodents also devour food supplies or contaminate what they don’t eat. Rats also spread harmful viruses and bacteria, and they can eat through almost any obstacle in pursuit of a meal or a safe haven to breed.

Seattle ranks high on the list of cities with a big rat problem. Households there are more than twice as likely to report rat sightings than the national average.

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