All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3:30pm - 5:30pm, 6pm - 7pm (Weekend ATC: Saturday & Sundays 5pm - 6 pm

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting.

In the 40 years since it debuted on 90 public radio stations in 1971, hosts, producers, editors and reporters and even the audience have changed. Yet one thing remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays (hosted today by Arun Rath).

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Ways to Connect

In an interview with All Things Considered, Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, declined to rule out coordination with Iran and Iranian-backed forces in Iraq. Dempsey also told NPR that one option in Iraq might involve U.S. air assets going after "high-value" individuals within the main Sunni insurgent group.

Leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are cracking down on members who openly dispute the doctrine of the faith. Earlier this week, a Mormon feminist was excommunicated for pursing membership in the all-male priesthood of the church. Now another member, John Dehlin, is facing the same fate — for questioning scripture and speaking out on behalf of gay Mormons.

"Pigeon: It's what's for dinner."

That might sound strange to us, but it could have been uttered by our great-grandparents. Baked into pot pies, stewed, fried or salted, the passenger pigeon was a staple for many North Americans.

But by 1914, only one was left: Martha.

Named after Martha Washington, she lived a long life at the Cincinnati Zoo until 1914. The bird, now on exhibit at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, was a celebrity.

Once Bitten, Twice Decried: Uruguay Outraged By Suarez Punishment

Jun 27, 2014

Luis Suarez's sponsors are dropping him, his future at his team Liverpool is in doubt and his 2014 World Cup is over. FIFA dealt the Uruguayan soccer player an unusually harsh sentence for biting his opponent, and his home country is outraged.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Events unfold. Plots unfold. And this summer, NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has been telling us how science unfolds. It's series we're creatively calling Unfolding Science.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME SONG)

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Let's go now to Massachusetts where staffs at abortion clinics are scrambling to adjust their plans after that ruling. From Boston, NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Of course, today's match drew big crowds in both the United States and Germany. We first go to NPR Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Berlin, who joined scores of Germans at a beer garden to watch the game on three screens outside.

Fans of the U.S. soccer team gathered across the country to watch Thursday's World Cup match against Germany. More than a thousand people watched the game at Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C., and many others filled Grant Park in Chicago. Meanwhile, NPR's Shereen Marisol Meraji was with fans in Los Angeles, and she offers some of their reactions.

This summer, All Things Considered is hearing about trade lingo: those words that people use in their professions that outsiders might not know. Captain Becca Johnston explains a "flying pickle" — a term that's frequently used on whale-watching trips.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

In Brazil, The Home Team's Not The Only Team To Root For

Jun 26, 2014

One might think Brazilians are rooting only for Brazil. But South America's largest country is much the U.S., in that it is a nation composed of many immigrant groups. All Things Considered watches World Cup games with Brazilians of both Japanese and Italian descent, to see who Brazilians root for when they don't root for Brazil.

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