Will Stone

KUNR Alum -- Now at KJZZ in Phoenix

Will Stone is a KUNR alumnus, having served as a passionate, talented reporter for KUNR for nearly two years before moving in early 2015 to the major Phoenix market at public radio station KJZZ.

An East Coast transplant, he's worked at NPR stations in Philadelphia, New York and Connecticut. He's also interned at the NPR West Headquarters in Los Angeles where he learned from some of the network's best correspondents. Before joining the public radio airwaves, he studied English at a small liberal arts college and covered arts and culture for an alternative newsweekly in Philadelphia.

He's particularly drawn to education, government and environmental reporting, as listeners became aware, he jumped on any story that got him out into the field with a mic in hand.

He enjoyed the Reno outdoors, food and cultural scene, given his liking for  hiking, fish tacos and great American poetry. While KUNR listeners miss his reporting, we're always glad to help prepare, encourage and support successful public radio professionals wherever they go.

See what Will is up to at KJZZ.

Ways to Connect

For rural parts of Northern Nevada, farming has been a mainstay for generations. But in one community, a new farm has awakened fierce debate over public health, the changing face of agriculture and a region's identity. Reno Public Radio's Will Stone has this report.

School campuses have become the latest testing ground for the debate over gun rights in Nevada. A bill that would allow those with concealed weapons permits to bring their guns on campus drew crowds to Carson City this week.

To hear both sides tell it, guns are either the panacea for some of the worst afflictions on campus—sexual assault and school shootings among them—or a toxic solution in search of a problem. 

Assemblywoman Shelly Shelton spent much of her testimony telling anecdotes like this:

"In 2010 in January, Jerald Young defended himself against three men. It was clear from video surveillance he was trying to get away from them, but Mr. Young  was charged with multiple charges, and it took him years to be acquitted by a jury." 

Assemblyman Richard Carrillo, a Democrat from Clark County, was arrested last night for DUI and possession of a firearm while intoxicated, according to the Carson City Sheriff. Carrillo, a union worker and contractor, is one of the most vocal critics of anti-labor legislation in Carson City. At this point, it's unclear whether Carrillo will resign.

Anh Gray

Right now, there are close to 2,000 portable classrooms in Washoe and Clark Counties alone because of overcrowding. Couple that with calls from business leaders, parents and both parties to improve education in Nevada, and you'd expect a bill that would create more schools to sail through.

“Except that we’re going to do that by stepping on your parents' backs. It’s the parents versus the kids. That’s what you’re doing with this bill. For someone to have the audacity to put this in front of my face and say it’s about schools...”

Nevada’s rural community colleges are cash-strapped. That will only get worse under the current budget proposal. Leaders from those colleges will be in Carson City on Tuesday in hopes of improving their outlook. 

Higher education in Nevada has faced some rough years. Now, the picture is beginning to change, but for rural community colleges, namely Western Nevada College and Great Basin, major cuts are still imminent.

The 2015 legislative session is only in its first weeks, but already some political observers in Nevada say the prognosis is not good. Republicans continue to deal with discord in their ranks. Governor Brian Sandoval's plan to increase taxes to fund education could face serious opposition from members of his own party. Meanwhile, police are investigating a possible extortion plot.


If you’re scratching your head about why the treasurer is designing the state’s budget, you’re not the only 

  one. In an unprecedented move, Nevada State Treasurer Dan Schwartz, a Republican, came forward with a plan that’s about half a billion dollars lower than Governor Brian Sandoval’s. It also eliminates the governor’s proposed taxes on business to fund education.

Speaking in front of the Senate Finance Committee, Schwartz put it this way:

Neal Cobb

As Reno has changed over the decades, so have the small businesses that set up shop here. No one knows this better than local historian Alicia Barber. 

Between 2011 and 2013, how many sexual offenses would you guess were reported at UNR's campus?

Just one.

"Like there’s no problem at all, and we know that’s just not true.”

Jennifer Lowman works at UNR and conducted the new survey on sexual misconduct on campus.