Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Paul Boger

 

A voter initiative may soon change how Nevadans register to vote.

 


IP-1 would create a process in which Nevada residents will automatically be registered to vote or have their information updated whenever they go to the DMV.  If voters do not wish to participate in the process, they will have to opt-out.

The 2017 Legislative Session is entering its second month. In the past weeks, lawmakers have debated legislation that would ratify the equal rights amendment, make changes to the enforcement of immigration laws as well as increase the development of renewable energy around the state. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger checked in with Senate Majority Leader Aaron Ford of Las Vegas. He says Democrats are moving forward with their plan known as the blueprint. 

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow local governments to decide whether adults will be able to use recreational marijuana in public places.

Nevada could soon become the first state to legalize the consumption of marijuana in public places. Senate Bill 236 would allow city and county officials to decide to permit short or long-term pot consumption at casinos, bars, outdoor events and other public places as long as they are not within 1000 feet of a school or community facility.

A bill making substantial changes in how Reno residents elect city council members is making its way through the legislature.

Paul Boger

 

State leaders, law enforcement and representatives from the state’s medical marijuana industry are working to create a set of recommendations on how to best regulate recreational marijuana.

ALEXA ARD

Nevada could soon become the first state in 35 years to vote in favor of the Equal Rights Amendment – a measure that would place legal protections for women in the U-S constitution. 

Paul Boger

Nevada lawmakers are considering a bill that would give victims of childhood sexual abuse more time to file a civil lawsuit against the perpetrators.

Assembly Bill 145 would give residents 20 years after they turn 18 to seek restitution from a person who sexually assaulted them. Under the state's current statute of limitations, victims have until they are 28.

The bi-partisan legislation was introduced into the Assembly by Democrat Irene Bustamante-Adams of Las Vegas and Republican Lisa Krasner of Reno.

Paul Boger

Nevada lawmakers are considering a bill that would eliminate the offices of State Controller and Treasurer. 

 

AJR6 would for all intents and purposes do away with the offices as elected positions and would instead make them appointees by the governor.

The measure’s primary sponsor is Democratic Assemblyman Elliot Anderson of Las Vegas. 

Paul Boger

Correction: When this story originally aired, it incorrectly stated that the student who was recently shot by a campus police officer at Hug High was killed. The version below has been corrected.

Students at Hug High School in Reno are asking city leaders for help in making positive changes in their community. They say seemingly small improvements, like adding more street lighting and placing recycling bins at bus stops, will increase safety and pride in and around the school.

Nevada's two Congressional Republicans have been confronted by protestors seeking answers on where they stand on a variety of issues, but most especially the Affordable Care Act, which the GOP has vowed to repeal. However, Nevada's Second District Congressman Mark Amodei says lawmakers need to examine the health care law piece-by-piece and evaluate each issue independently. 

"Wiping the whole thing out and starting over again invites that whole roll-out disaster that we had with the ACA, websties are crashing and all that other sort of stuff," says Amodei.

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