Paul Boger

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Paul Boger

President Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office have been contentious, to say the least. The Republican administration has sought to put the country back on a "winning track by reforming health care, immigration and taxes." However, Democrats like Nevada’s freshman Senator Catherine Cortez Masto have worked to keep the president’s legislative victories to a minimum.

Reno Public Radio’s political reporter, Paul Boger, sat down with Senator Cortez Masto to get the latest on those efforts, and what she sees as the best way to move America forward.

Alexa Ard

Lawmakers are one step closer to the end of the 2017 Legislative Session. Tuesday was the deadline to pass bills out of their house of origin if they were to move further into the legislative process. That means lawmakers had to approve hundreds of bills in relatively short order.

Below is a list and short description of the measures passed between the dates of April 17-25, 2017

Still Alive

Assembly

(Bill – Most Recent Vote Count -- Description)

Paul Boger

Nevada lawmakers are facing yet another deadline in the 2017 legislative session. According to the rules of both the Senate and Assembly, lawmakers are required to pass legislation out of their house of origin by Tuesday, lest the bills die.

However, lawmaker’s actions were not necessarily the top news of the week.

Illegal Voting Investigation

Airman 1st Class Nadine Y. Barclay/Wikimedia Commons

Nevada’s largest public utility, NV Energy, recently announced it is on track to surpass the state’s renewable energy mandate. Current policy requires utility providers to generate 25 percent of their power from renewables by 2025, but some say that’s not enough. Lawmakers are considering legislation to make the state greener.

It’s fair to say David Gibson’s home in Reno is a shrine to energy efficiency. All you have to do is look in his back yard to find out.

Paul Boger

More than one thousand people took to the streets of Reno this weekend as part of an effort to support and defend the role science and reasoning play in governmental policy.

Carrying signs that read "science is not an alternative fact" and "make America smart again," hundreds of lab coat wearing demonstrators called on policy makers to protect science from political whims.

The March for Science, as it was dubbed, took place in hundreds of cities around the country and for hundreds of different reasons whether it’s protecting grant funding or combating climate change.

Paul Boger

Republican members of Nevada's Congressional Delegation, Senator Dean Heller and 2nd District Representative Mark Amodei, got an ear-full from voters Monday during a combative town hall event.

Hundreds of bills introduced into the 2017 Legislative Session in Nevada are officially dead. Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick spoke to our political reporter, Paul Boger, about the latest. 

Nearly a quarter of the proposed bills introduced into the 2017 Legislative Session are officially dead. Before last week, there were more than one thousand bills up for consideration, but last Friday marked the deadline for lawmakers to advance legislation through a committee in its house of origin.

Paul Boger

Education, criminal justice reform, increasing the use of renewable energy, those are just some of the issues lawmakers are trying to tackle this legislative session. With yet another legislative deadline looming in the days ahead, lawmakers are scrambling and working late into the evening in order to pass as much legislation out of committees as possible. That’s why Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick spoke to our political reporter Paul Boger, to learn the latest from Carson City.

Conversion Therapy Ban

Amadscientist: Wikipedia CC

Lawmakers are quickly approaching the halfway point of the 2017 Legislative session. There are officially 62 days left, and there’s still a lot of work to be done. So let’s recap the past seven days.

COMMITTEE BILL INTRODUCTIONS

Monday marked yet another deadline for the introduction of bills by committees. Over the course of the day, the legislature 21 committees dropped another 175 bills.

Paul Boger

An effort to renew the GOP’s controversial plan to replace the Affordable Care Act seems to be gaining little traction. Yet, Nevada officials are still worried that any changes to the nation's current health care laws could result in thousands of Nevadans losing their coverage. 

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