Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

On Friday, the federal government shut down. Part of the reason was that lawmakers were unable to work out a deal on the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals program. Among the lawmakers who voted against a spending bill because of the lack of action on DACA, was Nevada’s Democratic Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. She spoke with our political reporter Paul Boger about that vote.

Paul Boger

Immigration advocates in Reno are calling on Congress to overturn the Trump Administration's recent decision to rescind temporary legal status for El Salvador residents living in the U.S. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger reports.


Right now in Washoe County, there are more than 900 children in foster care. When possible, these children are assigned a Court Appointed Special Advocate to provide them with support.

Our reporter Paul Boger spoke with judge Cynthia Lu to learn more about the CASA program and this continued need.


Paul Boger / Reno Public Radio

A district court judge in Carson City has ruled a controversial ballot initiative aimed at banning sanctuary cities in Nevada too confusing to move onto a statewide vote. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports.

Creative Commons / CC0 1.0 Universal

Starting this week, a new law aimed at curbing Nevada’s growing opioid crisis will require doctors to educate patients about the risks of using the drugs. It will also limit how much medication can be given for each prescription.

Unanimously passed by lawmakers and signed by the Governor earlier this year, the Controlled Substance Abuse Prevention Act went into effect January 1.

Essentially, the law will now require doctors to highlight the inherent risks associated with taking prescription opioids like oxycodone, codeine and morphine.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Pictures of Money

President Donald Trump is expected to sign the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, a sweeping $1.5 Trillion plan to overhaul the nation’s tax code. The Republican backed-bill is supposed to provide middle-class families across the country with tax breaks, while at the same time creating more jobs by lowering the tax burden on corporations. But what kind of impact will the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act have on Nevada?

Homeless teens in Reno don’t have access to an overnight shelter specifically for them, and many don’t feel safe at an adult shelter. On Wednesday, two short documentaries exploring local youth homelessness will be screening in Reno. Our reporter Paul Boger spoke to the organizer to learn more.

According to a U-S Housing and Urban Development survey from 2014, nearly one and three homeless individuals were under the age of 24. Nico Colombant is with the street reporting outfit from Our Town Reno and he says the pervasive nature of youth homelessness is often overlooked.

Reno could soon join the growing list of more than 100 cities around the nation that have pursued similar lawsuits.

Jacob Solis

Nevada’s Republican Attorney General Adam Laxalt is making his bid to become the state’s next governor official.

The 39-year-old conservative made the announcement via press release yesterday quickly followed by a campaign event in Las Vegas in the morning with a stop in Sparks later in the afternoon.

Speaking to a crowd of supporters in Northern Nevada, including several current Republican lawmakers, Laxalt told attendees that his goal as governor will be to ensure the state's bright future for his children.

 

Nevada’s Republican Senator Dean Heller may be in the political fight for his life. Political pundits have named him one of the most vulnerable members of Congress, and now he faces a challenge from within his own party. Our News Director Michelle Billman sat down with our political reporter Paul Boger to get the latest on Senator Heller’s reelection campaign. 

 

Paul, let’s start off with why we’re speaking to each other instead of airing an interview with Senator Heller.

 

Pages