Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Paul Boger

The Great Reno Balloon Race is one of the largest hot air balloon events in the world, with about 100 flying each year. Reporter Paul Boger experienced the 35-year tradition first hand and took these photos of the event.

During the Burning Man Festival, which wrapped this week, a huge temporary city is erected where there are only two things can use money for, ice and coffee. Everything else of value within the city’s limits is gifted, especially food. Paul Boger followed a camp gifting hot food to the denizens of Black Rock City.

The Burning Man Journal

Burning Man 2017 attracted nearly 70,000 people to Northern Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. The event has grown dramatically from its humble beginnings on the shores of the San Francisco Bay 31 years ago.

While out on the windy, dusty playa this year, Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger met with one of the event’s founders, Harley K. DuBois, to learn more about how it all started. 

Paul Boger

The art that's out on the playa in Black Rock City is an integral part of Burning Man. This year, artists from around the world have constructed pieces that run the gamut from large to small, including wood structures, paintings, and more. Our reporter Paul Boger spoke with Anabel Romero from Los Angeles who is part of a crew that has created a large wooden structure called Aluna as well as Harvey Branscomb of Colorado, who helped bring a piece called the Mammoth Art Car to Nevada.

Paul Boger

Two hours north of Reno, smack dab in the middle of the Black Rock Desert, is Burning Man. The week-long festival, which is intended to celebrate art and inclusivity, has also become synonymous with party culture and drug use. But despite its remote location, the event takes place on federal land, with law enforcement required to Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports, 

It’s a hot afternoon on the Playa, the winds have been kicking up large dust devils all day, and many Burners have begun the daily ritual of seeking a shady place to wait out the heat.

Paul Boger

The Burning Man festival in the Black Rock Desert attracts 70,000 people each year. Our reporter Paul Boger is there and took these photos of the artwork on the playa.

Christopher Michel

People from around the globe will descend upon Northern Nevada this weekend to take part in one of the largest arts and cultural events in the country -- Burning Man.

Located about two hours north of Reno in the Black Rock Desert, the festival has become one of the largest cultural events in the nation. And this year it's expected to draw an estimated 70,000 people to Northern Nevada. But what is the impact of the event, and what can we expect to see this year?

Reno Public Radio reached out to the Reno Gazette Journal 's Burning Man Reporter Jenny Kane to get the details

Paul Boger

President Donald Trump made quick work of his most recent trip to Reno, staying for only an hour and 23 minutes. But in that time, the president delivered a rather sedate message to veterans of the American Legion. 

In a speech that lasted less than a half hour, President Trump called Congress to take greater steps to improve services and support for veterans and their families. 

ed-alliance.org

This year, officials with Washoe County Schools are hopeful 80 percent of high school seniors in the district will be able to graduate on time. That would mark the highest graduation rate in the district’s history. At the same time, ACT scores have slipped and are beginning to lag behind the rest of the state.

Julia Ritchey

Officials with the Washoe County School District say they are anticipating a deficit somewhere between $22 and $28 million for this school year, making it the 10th year in a row the district’s expenses outpace revenue. Our News Director Michelle Billman sat down with Education Reporter Paul Boger to learn more.

So, school officials in Washoe County are looking at yet another year with large funding deficits. Can you tell us a little bit about what’s going on?

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