Paul Boger

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Nevada’s legislative leaders are accepting the resignation of Democratic Senator Mark Manendo as chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee. 

Manendo’s resignation comes as more individuals are stepping forward claiming he sexually harassed them this legislative session. 

The longtime lawmaker has been under an independent investigation for harassment since allegations sprang forward about two weeks ago. 

This is also the third time the Las Vegas Democrat has been accused of misconduct. However, through an attorney, Manendo has maintained his innocence. 

Michelle Matus

Beginning July 1, Nevadans will have the ability to legally purchase recreational marijuana for the first time. But as that industry prepares to ramp up production and sales many questions remain. Who can use cannabis? Where can they use it? And how will the state regulate its new commodity?

Nevada’s Second District Congressman, Republican Mark Amodei, has received criticism for his support for the controversial GOP-backed American Heath Care Act. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger sat down with Congressman Amodei to talk about his support of the bill.

"It's not politically sexy," says Amodei. "I didn't make a deal to get my picture taken on Air Force One or get a free public lands bill. It's like, you've taken care of my issue I'll support it."

Paul Boger

Nevada lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow terminally ill patients to "die with dignity." Senate Bill 261 gives doctors the ability to prescribe drugs designed to end the life of a patient with less than six months to live. Supporters call the proposal a blessing for those people left without treatment options. Opponents argue that the measure is a slippery slope that would give doctors permission to kill. 

With less than a month left in Nevada's 2017 Legislative Session, lawmakers still have to pass nearly 400 bills and an eight billion dollar state budget. Democrats have touted success in the passage of many of their priorities, but for Republicans, the session has been the most partisan in recent memory. Assembly Minority Leader Paul Anderson caught up with our political reporter Paul Boger about the final month of the session.

Controversial therapies that are meant to turn young gay people straight could soon be banned in Nevada.

A bill outlawing psychotherapists and social workers from providing what's called "sexual conversion therapy" to patients under 18 could soon make its way to the governor's desk.

Senate Bill 201 was passed by lawmakers in the Assembly, Tuesday after a 31-8 vote.

Speaking in favor of the measure, Assemblywoman Shannon Bilbray-Axelrod of Las Vegas says the controversial therapy has been shown to lead to depression, homelessness and suicide.

There is less than one month left in the 2017 Legislative Session, and that means, more and more, lawmakers are starting to turn their attention to the state budget. The latest numbers suggest that budget writers will have close to $8 billion to work with over the next two years. Reno Public Radio’s News Director Michelle Billman spoke with our political reporter Paul Boger about the revenue projection and other bills making their way through the process.

Optimistic Revenue Projections

Nearly 370,000 Nevadans could lose their health coverage by 2019 under a plan passed by the U.S. House of Representatives Thursday.

Under the proposed American Health Care Act, Nevada could see drastic changes especially to the number of people covered under the state’s Medicaid program. 

"They can't get in to see, unless they can pay for it, primary care provider," says Chuck Duarte who runs the Community Health Alliance, a federally qualified health center that provides medical, dental and psychological care for thousands of residents in Northern Nevada.

Paul Boger

Nevada’s Republican Governor, Brian Sandoval, is doubling down on efforts to fight the reopening of the nuclear waste storage facility at Yucca Mountain.

Fresh off a trip to Washington D.C. Governor Sandoval met with reporters last week to break down several meetings with key members of President Trump’s cabinet including Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke and Secretary of Energy Rick Perry.

Paul Boger

State lawmakers are one step closer to amending the Nevada Constitution to remove language banning same-sex marriage.

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