Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Flickr/Creative Commons/Pictures of Money

President Donald Trump is expected to sign the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, a sweeping $1.5 Trillion plan to overhaul the nation’s tax code. The Republican backed-bill is supposed to provide middle-class families across the country with tax breaks, while at the same time creating more jobs by lowering the tax burden on corporations. But what kind of impact will the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act have on Nevada?

Homeless teens in Reno don’t have access to an overnight shelter specifically for them, and many don’t feel safe at an adult shelter. On Wednesday, two short documentaries exploring local youth homelessness will be screening in Reno. Our reporter Paul Boger spoke to the organizer to learn more.

According to a U-S Housing and Urban Development survey from 2014, nearly one and three homeless individuals were under the age of 24. Nico Colombant is with the street reporting outfit from Our Town Reno and he says the pervasive nature of youth homelessness is often overlooked.

Reno could soon join the growing list of more than 100 cities around the nation that have pursued similar lawsuits.

Jacob Solis

Nevada’s Republican Attorney General Adam Laxalt is making his bid to become the state’s next governor official.

The 39-year-old conservative made the announcement via press release yesterday quickly followed by a campaign event in Las Vegas in the morning with a stop in Sparks later in the afternoon.

Speaking to a crowd of supporters in Northern Nevada, including several current Republican lawmakers, Laxalt told attendees that his goal as governor will be to ensure the state's bright future for his children.

 

Nevada’s Republican Senator Dean Heller may be in the political fight for his life. Political pundits have named him one of the most vulnerable members of Congress, and now he faces a challenge from within his own party. Our News Director Michelle Billman sat down with our political reporter Paul Boger to get the latest on Senator Heller’s reelection campaign. 

 

Paul, let’s start off with why we’re speaking to each other instead of airing an interview with Senator Heller.

 

Political pundits from across the country have named Senator Dean Heller as one of the most vulnerable Republicans in Congress. And before he can even think about campaigning in a general election, he first has to make it past the primary where he’s facing opposition from the right. Reno Public Radio sat down with Heller’s challenger, Danny Tarkanian, to find out why he’s running against the incumbent.

Why run for this? Why challenge a sitting Republican?

An effort to recall three state Senators from Las Vegas, two Democrats as well as a Republican-turned-independent, could swing the balance of power in the Nevada legislature. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger spoke to Michelle Rindels -- a reporter with the Nevada Independent -- to get the latest on the petitions.

Can you give us a little background on the petition process itself? How does it work, and how do you actually recall an elected officials in Northern Nevada?

In roughly one year's time, Nevadans will head to the polls to select who will represent them in the US Senate. One of the candidates is first-term Democratic Congresswoman Jacky Rosen of Las Vegas. Our reporter Paul Boger sat down with Representative Rosen why she's running for higher office.

You're a first-term Congresswoman, and I wanted to start off by getting your thoughts on how your first months in office are going and how that compares to the expectations you had going in?

Alexa Ard

Nearly half of the public school students in Nevada's Capital City live below the poverty line, and for educators, that can present a real challenge. 

"If you think about two kids walking into any school in our school district together, one of those kids may not have had breakfast that morning -- may not have enough food going home into the weekend -- or are challenged in some other economic way. So you take that and you combine it maybe with a student who is not an English language native speaker, they're at disadvantage." 

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Nevada's Democratic US Senator, Catherine Cortez Masto, is calling on Congress to take up gun control in the aftermath of the Las Vegas shooting.

On a rare occasion, both of Nevada's US Senators made back-to-back speeches on the Senate floor yesterday, to honor the victims of this month's horrific mass shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and hundreds more wounded.

Republican Senator Dean Heller told his fellow lawmakers Las Vegas has been able to come together to form a tighter community.

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