Jacob Solis

Student Reporter

Jacob is a senior at the University of Nevada, Reno studying journalism and political science. Before coming to KUNR in the fall of 2017, Jacob worked for KNPR as a reporter covering Nevada’s 2017 legislative session in Carson City. He has also been a writer and editor for UNR’s student-run newspaper, The Nevada Sagebrush, since 2014.

A Las Vegas native, Jacob is a long-time super-fan of all things public radio. When he’s not out covering stories, he’ll spend his free time catching up on a book, compulsively listening to podcasts, bingeing Veep and learning how not to cook so badly. 

Jacob Solis

 

For the first time in 14 years, Washoe County is going to have new voting machines.

 

The new machines are large tablets, about two feet tall and one foot wide. At a price of $4.2 million dollars for the whole system, the tablets will provide a number of new accessibility and usability improvements.

Heather Carmen is the Assistant Registrar of Voters for Washoe County.

 

Jacob Solis

 

A bill from Senator Dean Heller is looking to curb gang violence, in part, by making it easier to deport known gang members or immigrants associated with gangs, but not everyone is so sure it's the right move. Reno Public Radio's Jacob Solis spoke to a law professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas to find out more.

And a warning, this interview does contain some graphic details.

 

 

In his memoir Mulligan’s Wake, author Dave Mulligan recounts some of his outlandish adventures as a young adult following the death of his father. Many of the stories are littered with humor and absurd situations, but at the heart of his writing is an honest look at one man's attempt to grieve for his deceased father in an unconventional way.

Perhaps the most unbelievable story took place decades ago when Mulligan paid a late night visit to Marineland in Palos Verdes, California, which has since closed.

Famartin via Wikimedia Commons

 

On Monday, President Donald Trump finally unveiled his long awaited infrastructure plan. It includes $200 billion in new funding, but under the proposed incentive structure, only 20 percent of any given project can be funded by the federal government.

Alexa Ard

 In September, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced major changes to how colleges and universities handle sexual assault. But long-term changes remain unclear, even three months after the announcement. Our news director Michelle Billman sat down with reporter Jacob Solis to sort this all out.

Alexa Ard

 

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently moved to undo an Obama-era expansion of Title IX enforcement, she left the world of higher education with a lot of questions. The old rules were meant to give more protections to victims of sexual assault on college campuses. DeVos says they go too far and deny those accused of assault due process. But at the University of Nevada, Reno, the people who work with sexual assault victims aren’t so sure.

 

 

Jacob Solis

 

When Education Secretary Betsy DeVos moved to undo Obama-era rules for Title IX investigations at colleges and universities, it left a lot of questions. Chief among them: what standard of evidence should schools use when they investigate possible sexual assaults? Reno Public Radio’s Jacob Solis has more.

 

In 2011, the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights issued a Dear Colleague Letter that instructed colleges to use a specific standard in their investigations: preponderance of the evidence.

Nevada Legislative Building
Alexa Ard

Reno assemblywoman Amber Joiner, a Democrat, is choosing not to run for reelection in 2018. Joiner was appointed to her seat in Assembly District 24 in 2014, and since then has served for two regular sessions and two special sessions.

 

 

But in an email to The Nevada Independent, Joiner says the financial burden of campaigning and serving is unsustainable.

 

Jacob Solis

Hundreds of students gathered at the University of Nevada, Reno last night for a vigil. It was held in honor of those hurt or killed in Las Vegas Sunday, and our reporter Jacob Solis has the story.

The night started with music performed by students, and its melodies set the tone for an hour filled with grief, sadness, and hope.

About one-fifth of UNR’s students come from Southern Nevada, which means the campus community has been hit particularly hard.

Alexa Ard

The University of Nevada, Reno has been dealing with the aftermath of recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia where one of its students was photographed participating in a white supremacist rally. 

The events have sparked broader conversations about diversity on campus -- and vocal criticism of the school's efforts, including the recent appointment of its chief diversity officer.   It was a decision made by university president Marc Johnson, who spoke Thursday with our reporter Jacob Solis. 

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