Esther Ciammachilli

Afternoon Host/News

Esther began her career with KUNR in March of 2013, having made the transition from commercial radio. Esther received her degree in journalism from the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno. Before graduating, she was awarded the Outstanding Broadcast Student Award from the Reynolds School.

Originally from San Diego, California, Esther moved to Las Vegas, Nevada in 2001 where she worked as a singing gondolier at the Venetian Hotel and Casino. At night, she was an actress in an improvisational dinner theater called "Tony and Tina's Wedding," where she played several different parts (not all at once though). She is a trained improvisational actor and has worked with the Reno Little Theater after moving to the north in 2010.

 

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Wisconsin Department of Health

Asthma kills about 30 people in Nevada every year and the disease is prevalent among young people. 

Recent studies show that nearly 24 percent of high school females, and 26 percent of males indicated having asthma. Creating more awareness about this disease is the goal of National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month, held each May. Linda Lewis is a member of the Nevada Statewide Asthma Coalition. She says emerging research also links childhood obesity to more severe asthma issues.

San Diego County Dep. of Health and Human Services

Nevada and three other states, lead the nation for placing children who are under state care, into a family environment rather than a group home or institution. 

Esther Ciammachilli

Today on the University of Nevada School of Medicine Health Watch, we’re talking about the new geriatric specialty clinic opening this summer at the Sanford Center for Aging on the UNR campus. Joining KUNR for this discussion is Dr. Steven Phillips, a board certified physician in internal medicine and geriatrics.  He serves on the faculty of the Department of Internal Medicine at the School of Medicine and is the new medical director for the Sanford Center for Aging at the University of Nevada, Reno.

A tree-thinning project covering 800 acres near Clear Creek could get more water flowing to the Carson River. 

Clearing some of the dense forest around Clear Creek near Carson City is an ongoing project by The Nature Conservancy in an effort to prevent wildfires from spreading quickly through the area.

U.S. Department of Energy

 

A new program is turning some middle and high school students in Reno and Sparks into energy detectives.

Foreclosures in Nevada jumped nearly 40 percent last month, making the state second in the nation for the highest residential foreclosure rate. 

The real estate analytics company RealtyTrac reported yesterday (Wednesday) that one in every 555 Nevada residential properties was subject to a foreclosure filing in April, behind only Florida

Nevada saw 893 foreclosure starts, 681 notices of pending trustee sales and 548 repossessions.

National Park Service

Nevada's warming weather means reptiles like rattlesnakes will be out during the daytime hours - and when that's the case, they can pose dangerous threats to residents.

Ninety percent of rattlesnake bites can be avoided if the animal is left alone. That's according to Chris Healy from the Nevada Department of Wildlife. He says many snake bites result from people approaching, rather than avoiding the snake.

Did you know that the majority of flu viruses originate in birds? On this UNR Health Watch, we talk about infectious diseases that are transmitted through animals with Dr. Daniel Shapiro, professor and H. Edward Manville, Jr. endowed chair of internal medicine at the University Of Nevada School Of Medicine.  Leading this discussion is Richelle O’Driscoll, director of public affairs at the School of Medicine and Division of Health Sciences. 

Esther Ciammachilli

Believe it or not, some businesses flourish when there's a drought. As Nevada enters it's fourth dry season in a row, many residents are trying to do their part to conserve water and they're asking area landscapers for help. Reno Public Radio's Esther Ciammachilli sat down with Lebo Newman from  Signature Landscapes to see how the drought is impacting their business and get tips on how to save water.  

Nevada health officials say immunization rates among children in Nevada are a mixed bag. 

The good news is Nevada has improved to 39th in the nation for the percentage of children who receive vaccinations for tetanus, whooping cough and meningitis. That’s up from 49th just a decade ago. The state has also seen a jump in MMR vaccinations, which is the virus that causes measles.

However, Nevada is 49th for infant immunizations. Only 60 percent of children ages 19 months to three years have received all recommended vaccinations. The national average is about 70 percent.

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