Anh Gray

News Reporter

Anh joined the KUNR news team in spring 2014. She has graduate degrees in public health from Boston University and international education from Teachers College, Columbia University. In 2015, Anh received an award from the Associated Press Television Radio Association for producing a spot news story called “Anti-Campus Carry Protestors Rally At UNR.” She also contributed to KUNR's "Behind The Battery Boom," a series on electric car maker, Tesla, which received an Edward R. Murrow award for the station. 

In 2016, Anh was selected to participate in the International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation Fellowship in New York City. She is also a member of the Asian American Journalists Association. 

Her reporting for KUNR has included in-depth coverage on health policy in Nevada, community health programs and the opioid addiction epidemic.

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be public radio fans. When not working on her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekend road trips.

Acccording to a recent study, Nevada doesn’t have enough skilled workers to fill high-tech jobs, like the ones Tesla Motors will need for its gigafactory.  

Flights between Reno and Europe have never been available, but that’s changing next year with nonstop service to and from London. This is part of the Reno airport’s strategy to raise its international profile.

This new addition comes on the heels of last month’s announcement that Reno-Tahoe International Airport will be offering nonstop flights to Guadalajara, Mexico. The flight which is set to begin this December will be the first time in 15 years the airport has offered international travel.

Now that the polls have closed, Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss talks to fellow reporter Will Stone about voter turnout and the GOP's edge statewide.

Republicans across the state continue to outpace Democrats in voter turnout. Overall, statewide turnout is about 36% so far. Given those numbers, Reno Public Radio’s Will Stone reports Democrats here are in danger of losing most of the statewide races and the state senate. 

And Michelle Bliss reports, at polling spots in Reno, most voters have been focused on local races and ballot questions.

Photo by Anh Gray

Nevada celebrates 150 years of statehood at the end of October. There have been many events this year celebrating it’s history and culture. At a recent event, thousands of people across Nevada belted out the state song to set a world record, including more than 400 boisterous elementary school students in Reno.

The kids were dressed in an array of storybook and superhero costumes for Halloween and they gathered in the school cafeteria, so that at 10 a.m. sharp, they could break out into song. A special guest who was helping them set the record became unexpectedly emotional.

Photo courtesy of Western Nevada College

A traveling exhibit honoring veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars is making its way across the Silver State. The Nevada 150 Commission selected the display as an official sesquicentennial event. The exhibit's next stop is at Great Basin College in Elko, where visitors will see the faces of nearly 7,000 service members lost in battle.

With football season underway, one high school here in Northern Nevada is trying out a new way to prevent serious head injuries. Galena High School in south Reno is now the first school in the state to offer all players a helmet with special sensor technology.

Galena football coach Greg Sakelaris says the high-tech helmets act like “another set of eyes” out in the field. If there is notable impact, the sensors send a signal to a hand-held monitor.  

This November, voters will decide whether to remove the five percent cap on mining taxes in the Nevada Constitution. Last week Vegas PBS hosted a debate on  ballot question 2. Bob Fulkerson of the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada argues in favor of it.

“Last year, Nevada’s world class gold industry raked in $8.1 billion dollars and paid to the state general fund $74 million dollars in mining taxes, for a tax rate of less than one percent,” Fulkerson says.

Photo by Anh Gray

There’s an array of social support that a person living in poverty may need, like access to a shelter, a food pantry or health care. But actually getting those services can be challenging and time consuming. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada began using a new photo ID system this month to make getting this type of help much easier.

On a typical day, roughly 800 people come through the doors of the St. Vincent’s food pantry in downtown Reno. Michael Robbins is one of about two dozen people waiting to pick up a box of canned foods and some fruit.

Photo by Anh Gray

There’s an array of social support that a person living in poverty may need, like access to a shelter, a food pantry or health care. But actually getting those services can be challenging and time consuming. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada began using a new photo ID system this month to make getting this type of help much easier.

Medical marijuana is soon coming to Reno, but you won’t see people lighting up outside. This week, the Reno City Council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance that prohibits the use of the drug in public.

Reno Deputy Police Chief Tom Robinson says the main reason for the law is to get people to use the medical treatment at home because public possession of it is unsafe. He says that’s one of the lessons he learned from Denver when he visited the city and spoke to officials there.

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