Anh Gray

News Reporter

Anh joined the KUNR news team in spring 2014. She has graduate degrees in public health from Boston University and international education from Teachers College, Columbia University. In 2015, Anh received an award from the Associated Press Television Radio Association for producing a spot news story called “Anti-Campus Carry Protestors Rally At UNR.” Her reporting for KUNR has included in-depth coverage on youth homelessness, overcrowding in the Washoe County School District and the opioid addiction epidemic.

In 2016, Anh was selected to participate in the International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation Fellowship in New York City. She is also a member of the Asian American Journalists Association. 

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be public radio fans. When not working on her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekend road trips.

Expert says Ebola threat to Nevada is low

Oct 2, 2014
Photo by Anh Gray

This week the Center for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of Ebola in the U.S. raising questions across the country about how serious that threat really is for Americans. Despite heightened concerns, risks remain low for Nevada.

Now that Tesla will be setting up shop in Storey County to make batteries for its electric cars, Truckee Meadows Community College is planning to develop more programs for skilled high-tech workers.  Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports that the school will build on what it already has to offer.

For much of the 20th century, Reno was a household name notorious for quickie divorces. Historians with the University of Nevada, Reno have just received a nearly $80,000 grant to preserve this part of local history.

For nearly six decades, Reno was known as the “divorce capital of the world” with people from all over the globe traveling to the Biggest Little City to end their marriages.

Several Nevada historians, including Mella Harmon, are seeking to document that time, which lasted from around 1910 through the end of the sixties.

The cost of fighting wildfires has more than doubled in the last two decades in the country, according to the federal government. That shift could be serious for Nevada.

To cover the increased expenses, states have had to engage in “fire borrowing,” which means moving federal funds from fire prevention to fighting them instead.

The crime rate in Incline Village has been falling for the past several years, but Chuck Allen, a candidate for sheriff in the November election, says that fact is misleading. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports.

State wildlife officials say they are concerned that climate change and urbanization might diminish the native bee population. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports the Nevada Department of Agriculture is putting together guidelines to protect these important pollinators of natural plants.

Jeff Knight is the state’s entomologist. His job is primarily to keep the bad bugs out and to monitor the ones that are vital to the local environment.

Tesla Motors

Nevada and four other Western states are serious contenders for Tesla Motor’s $5 billion battery plant. This week, several watchdog groups issued a public letter asking all those states to tell taxpayers what they are offering to entice the electric carmaker, which is asking for about $500 million in tax breaks and incentives.

Bob Fulkerson is with one of the advocacy groups, Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada. He says the letter makes several demands of the state governments involved in negotiations with Tesla:

New funding is needed for Tahoe boat inspection program

Aug 28, 2014

The Lake Tahoe boat inspection program prevents invasive species from contaminating the water. Federal funding for the program lasts just one more year and it’s unclear where the money will come from after that.

For the last five years, boats launched into Lake Tahoe have been inspected to prevent non-native species like quagga mussels from wreaking havoc on the lake’s eco-system.

Morris Burner Hotel brings Black Rock experience to Reno

Aug 26, 2014
Photo by Decibel Photography from Morris Burner Hotel Facebook.

This is the first year some festival-goers can head to the Morris Burner Hotel in downtown Reno after leaving the playa to continue their Black Rock experience.

Jim Gibson, retired CEO of a micro-chip company also known by his Burner name, “Jungle Jim” bought the old, run-down hotel last year. Gibson says he has managed to revamp it by applying some of the Burning Man principles like communal effort, civic responsibility, participation and self-expression.

  

The top military official from the Kingdom of Tonga is in the Silver State marking his country's unique partnership with the Nevada National Guard.

Brigadier General Tau'aika ’Uta’atu and his small delegation gather by a hanger at the Reno-Stead Airport. They’re there to observe Air National Guardsmen perform some military drills.

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