Anh Gray

News Reporter

Anh joined the KUNR news team in spring 2014. She has graduate degrees in public health from Boston University and international education from Teachers College, Columbia University. In 2015, Anh received an award from the Associated Press Television Radio Association for producing a spot news story called “Anti-Campus Carry Protestors Rally At UNR.” Her reporting for KUNR has included in-depth coverage on youth homelessness, overcrowding in the Washoe County School District and the opioid addiction epidemic.

In 2016, Anh was selected to participate in the International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation Fellowship in New York City. She is also a member of the Asian American Journalists Association. 

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be public radio fans. When not working on her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekend road trips.

Photo courtesy of Western Nevada College

A traveling exhibit honoring veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars is making its way across the Silver State. The Nevada 150 Commission selected the display as an official sesquicentennial event. The exhibit's next stop is at Great Basin College in Elko, where visitors will see the faces of nearly 7,000 service members lost in battle.

With football season underway, one high school here in Northern Nevada is trying out a new way to prevent serious head injuries. Galena High School in south Reno is now the first school in the state to offer all players a helmet with special sensor technology.

Galena football coach Greg Sakelaris says the high-tech helmets act like “another set of eyes” out in the field. If there is notable impact, the sensors send a signal to a hand-held monitor.  

This November, voters will decide whether to remove the five percent cap on mining taxes in the Nevada Constitution. Last week Vegas PBS hosted a debate on  ballot question 2. Bob Fulkerson of the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada argues in favor of it.

“Last year, Nevada’s world class gold industry raked in $8.1 billion dollars and paid to the state general fund $74 million dollars in mining taxes, for a tax rate of less than one percent,” Fulkerson says.

Photo by Anh Gray

There’s an array of social support that a person living in poverty may need, like access to a shelter, a food pantry or health care. But actually getting those services can be challenging and time consuming. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada began using a new photo ID system this month to make getting this type of help much easier.

On a typical day, roughly 800 people come through the doors of the St. Vincent’s food pantry in downtown Reno. Michael Robbins is one of about two dozen people waiting to pick up a box of canned foods and some fruit.

Photo by Anh Gray

There’s an array of social support that a person living in poverty may need, like access to a shelter, a food pantry or health care. But actually getting those services can be challenging and time consuming. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada began using a new photo ID system this month to make getting this type of help much easier.

Medical marijuana is soon coming to Reno, but you won’t see people lighting up outside. This week, the Reno City Council voted unanimously to approve an ordinance that prohibits the use of the drug in public.

Reno Deputy Police Chief Tom Robinson says the main reason for the law is to get people to use the medical treatment at home because public possession of it is unsafe. He says that’s one of the lessons he learned from Denver when he visited the city and spoke to officials there.

For the first time in 15 years, Reno-Tahoe International Airport will actually have international service. A new nonstop flight to Guadalajara, Mexico is tentatively set to begin by the end of this year.

Spokesman Brian Kulpin says the airport hired an outside company to study the economic impact of the twice-weekly flight. The study found it would bring an estimated $20 million each year to the region.

Expert says Ebola threat to Nevada is low

Oct 2, 2014
Photo by Anh Gray

This week the Center for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of Ebola in the U.S. raising questions across the country about how serious that threat really is for Americans. Despite heightened concerns, risks remain low for Nevada.

Now that Tesla will be setting up shop in Storey County to make batteries for its electric cars, Truckee Meadows Community College is planning to develop more programs for skilled high-tech workers.  Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports that the school will build on what it already has to offer.

For much of the 20th century, Reno was a household name notorious for quickie divorces. Historians with the University of Nevada, Reno have just received a nearly $80,000 grant to preserve this part of local history.

For nearly six decades, Reno was known as the “divorce capital of the world” with people from all over the globe traveling to the Biggest Little City to end their marriages.

Several Nevada historians, including Mella Harmon, are seeking to document that time, which lasted from around 1910 through the end of the sixties.

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