Anh Gray

News Producer

Anh joined the KUNR news team in spring 2014 as a producer. She has graduate degrees in public health from Boston University and international education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She spent a decade working in the nonprofit and higher education sectors. After being a stay-at-home mom for several years, she decided to pursue a career in journalism, which was once a childhood aspiration.

She’s been a longtime listener of KUNR and NPR. She enjoys hearing local and global news stories over the radio; it makes her feel more connected to the world. Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be public radio fans.

All this week, KUNR is exploring what it takes for Nevada’s high schoolers to make it to graduation. In our state,  English Language Learners have a dismal graduation rate—not even a third finish school. But there’s a senior from Hug High School in Reno, who has beat the odds, and has even won a Gates Millennium Scholarship, which will pay for college. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has more.

There are about 2,300 students in the Washoe County School District who are homeless and they’re at much greater risk for dropping out of school. But, there’s a McQueen High School senior determined to be the first in her family to go to college despite not having a permanent place to live. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has more.

People living in poverty in rural Nevada will have more access to food and other social support this summer.   

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada, which runs the St. Vincent’s Food Pantry in Reno, recently received a $2 million grant from the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services.  The money will help St. Vincent’s to expand their services to an additional 11 counties across the state by August.

A tree-thinning project covering 800 acres near Clear Creek could get more water flowing to the Carson River. 

Clearing some of the dense forest around Clear Creek near Carson City is an ongoing project by The Nature Conservancy in an effort to prevent wildfires from spreading quickly through the area.

Richelle O'Driscoll

Today on the University of Nevada Health Watch, we learn about students who want to live a “sober lifestyle” and the programs available to help them. Our guests are two substance abuse experts. Daniel Fred coordinates a campus recovery program and Dr. Meri Shadley teaches about addiction treatment at UNR. Leading this discussion is Richelle O’Driscoll, director of public affairs for the University of Nevada School of Medicine and Division of Health Sciences.

Many more Nevadans are getting vaccinated for the measles this year.

angelfire.com

The Reno City Council met this week to discuss how to spend tax payer’s money for the fiscal year 2016 budget, which is nearly $170 million. Reno Public Radio's Danna O'Connor reports much of that money will go toward public safety. 

More than two-thirds of that budget will be spent on adding nearly 50 new public safety jobs. Ten of those jobs would go toward hiring 10 more Reno firefighters.

At the meeting, Councilwoman Neoma Jardon asked if the 10 firefighters would open up the browned out stations in the city.

This week, Nevada lawmakers have unanimously passed Senate Bill 177, the Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable Act, also known as the “CARE Act."

The new law requires hospitals to enter the name of a patient’s home care provider in their medical record. This caregiver will then receive information and instruction on follow-up care after the patient is released from the hospital.

The lush green lawns around Washoe County are sparking a local debate about what types of plants are right for the dry high desert region, especially during this fourth year of drought. As part of our series on the ongoing drought, Reno Public Radio's Anh Gray reports.

Alexa Ard

The Truckee Meadows Water Authority is asking customers to voluntarily cut their water usage by ten percent. To figure out how to actually do that, we reached out to local experts who offered these tips:

Tip #1: Monitor and adjust your irrigation system

People use four times more water in the summer to irrigate their lawns. Here's Master Gardener Wendy Hanson-Mazet from the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension with a tip on how to cut back on that amount.

Tip #2: Use mulch

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