News

Anh Gray

One out of five students at the University of Nevada, Reno hails from the Las Vegas area. The recent mass shooting has left many students anxious and sad. Reno Public Radio Anh Gray reports that a campus pet therapy program is offering a bit of solace.

A student at Truckee Meadows Community College is one of the victims who was killed during the Las Vegas shooting Sunday. Our News Director Michelle Billman reports.

His name is Austin Meyer and he was at the country music festival celebrating his 24th birthday with his fiancée, Dana Getreu, who is a student at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Meyer was in the transportation technologies program at TMCC, which is a small cohort of students who work together closely. Kyle Dalpe is the dean of technical sciences and had to break the news to Meyer's classmates.

Los panelistas fueron miembros de las fuerzas de seguridad de Reno, el concejal Oscar Delgado y Carina Black del Centro Internacional del Norte de Nevada.
Natalie Van Hoozer

 

Una iglesia en Reno llevó a cabo un foro junto con fuerzas de seguridad y organizaciones locales de la comunidad para conversar sobre temas de inmigración y refugiados. La reportera Natalie Van Hoozer informa.

  

Todos los asientos en el Ministerio Palabra de Vida estaban ocupados, con más de cien miembros de la comunidad. Para el Pastor César Minera, el lugar donde se llevó a cabo el foro fue crucial para la asistencia al evento.   

Jacob Solis

Hundreds of students gathered at the University of Nevada, Reno last night for a vigil. It was held in honor of those hurt or killed in Las Vegas Sunday, and our reporter Jacob Solis has the story.

The night started with music performed by students, and its melodies set the tone for an hour filled with grief, sadness, and hope.

About one-fifth of UNR’s students come from Southern Nevada, which means the campus community has been hit particularly hard.

The Nevada State Medical Association (NSMA) is a nonprofit agency representing doctors in the state. After the mass shooting in Las Vegas on Sunday night, NSMA Executive Director Catherine O’Mara says she received many calls from around the country from medical and trauma groups offering to help.

Eje Gustafsson / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

People are slowly starting to get back to the Las Vegas Strip, after Sunday night's mass shooting. And stories are beginning to trickle out about how residents and visitors helped save lives during the massacre.

Paul Boger

Mourners gathered in downtown Reno, Monday night to hold a vigil for the 59 people killed and more than 500 injured during Sunday's mass shooting in Las Vegas. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger has this report.

David Stanley / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

After a mass shooting during a country music concert in Las Vegas left dozens dead and hundreds more injured, the community is left to come together to make sense of the tragedy.

A Reno police officer blocks off a road that leads to a house owned by Stephen Paddock, the Las Vegas shooter who opened fire at a crowd attending a country music concert.
Paul Boger

Tuesday, 4 p.m. update:

Investigators have finished searching Stephen Paddock's Reno home, the man who planned the Las Vegas shooting rampage on Sunday. They've found five handguns, two shotguns and a plethora of ammunition.

That brings the total number of guns owned by Paddock to 49. He had 23 guns in his hotel room at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, many of which were high-powered, and another 19 at his home in Mesquite.

Anh Gray

Nevadans woke up this morning to hear that the nation’s deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history took place in their state. And within hours, a blood bank in Reno had a line out the door. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports.

Dozens of people flocked to a United Blood Services center as soon as it opened.  Skylar Noetzel is a student at the University of Nevada, Reno who’s resting alongside others who’ve just donated.

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