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Anne McMillin, APR

There can be dangers associated with sports conducted in the snow. Dr. Mark Stovak, is a sports medicine physician from the University of Nevada School of Medicine and he spoke about how to best prepare for outdoor winter sports.

Leading the discussion with Stovak is Anne McMillin, APR, with the University of Nevada School of Medicine.

Rennett Stowe / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

The Lake Tahoe region is experiencing higher housing costs and stagnating wages for its workers. That's according to a recent economic prosperity report. To learn more, Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick chatted with Heidi Hill Drum; she's the executive director of the Tahoe Prosperity Center and one of the people behind this report.

Unusual Snowpack Means Unusual Avalanches

9 hours ago
Sierra Avalanche Center

Unusual snowpack conditions in the Sierra Nevada mountains are contributing to an increase of a type of avalanche quite uncommon for the area. Our contributor Luiza Vieira has the story.

Even with all the snow Northern Nevada and California are receiving, the number of avalanches has not increased. The Sierra Avalanche Center, however, is seeing a type of avalanche that has not happened in this area in years.

Julia Ritchey

Rideshare company Uber is now allowed to pick up passengers at the Reno-Tahoe International Airport.

Uber has been able to drop off customers at the airport since September, when they began operating in the state. But until Wednesday, they weren't able to pick anyone up.

Now, the rideshare service has a contract with the airport, like other ground transportation services, and its own designated pickup spot — away from the taxi line — complete with transit shelter.

City of Reno

Reno City Council unanimously approved an annexation request for a small chunk of Lemmon Valley, just north of the city, at its last meeting. That's despite complaints raised by several nearby residents.

Reno Public Radio's Michelle Billman has the details.

The land is being eyed for development and its owner says the 730 acres would be ideal for new housing. 

Brian Turner, Flickr, CC ATTRIBUTION 2.0 GENERIC

The Washoe County Public Defender's Office is seeing a huge rise in its caseload, especially for issues related to mental illness.

Contributor Bob Conrad from our media partner ThisisReno explores why.

The Public Defender's Office is charged with defending those who cannot afford legal counsel and is asking the Washoe County Commission for a budget increase because resources are stretched thin.

"We are at the top level of capacity," says Public Defender Jeremy Bosler.

Alexa Ard

The Washoe County Regional Transportation Commission is holding public open houses this week to get feedback on what transit services are most important to the community. Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick reports.

The Washoe County transit system is running at a deficit of $1 million a year. RTC Spokesman Joe Harrington says that along with rider fares, sales tax revenues help pay for transit.

CoCreatr, Flickr, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

  Last week state regulators ruled against suspending rate hikes for rooftop solar customers, which industry advocates say have sparked massive layoffs. But even before this decision, the industry was not faring as well as some had hoped. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports.

Truckee Meadows Community College started its solar technician training program about six years ago and quickly saw enrollments of between 15 to 30 students. 

But that didn't last long, according to Jim New, dean of technical sciences.

Jon S, Flickr, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

It's been about a month since the news broke that Vegas power player Sheldon Adelson secretly purchased the largest newspaper in state, the Las Vegas Review Journal. But the repercussions of this sale are still unfolding. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey spoke with local journalism professor Alan Deutschman about the fallout. Below are excerpts of their conversation.

Reno Council Green-Lights New Verdi Development

Jan 17, 2016
Colliers International

Reno City Council gave the green light last week to a new development in Verdi, despite objections from nearby residents. Our contributor Bob Conrad from our media partner ThisisReno has the story.

The Meridian 120 North development will allow for nearly 300 single family homes on about 100 acres.

The city's planning commission had approved the subdivision, but Verdi residents appealed, citing concerns about water availability for the planned unit development or PUD.

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