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In the New Hampshire primary, we saw Bernie Sanders come out way on top, by even more than expected. But can he keep that momentum heading into South Carolina and then Nevada, where Hillary Clinton has had boots on the ground for a whole year? To dig into that question, our News Director Michelle Billman spoke with two local political scientists, Precious Hall and Fred Lokken who both teach at Truckee Meadows Community College.

New Battery Recycling Plant Emits Cloud Of Confusion

14 hours ago
Amy Westervelt

A California tech company hopes to demonstrate eco-friendly lead battery recycling at its new plant in the Tahoe-Reno Industrial Center. But there's been plenty of confusion surrounding the new plant. Reno Public Radio's Amy Westervelt sorts it out.

Aqua Metals is tight-lipped about the specifics of its technology, but in broad terms it recycles batteries using a water-based solvent. Chief commercial officer Steven Cotton says the company's new recycling facility, currently being built in Storey County, will be "practically emission free."

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  The Nevada Public Utilities Commission will grandfather rooftop solar customers from higher rates after public outcry. Reno Public Radio’s Julia Ritchey reports.

Commissioners voted to phase in higher electricity costs over the course of 12 years, still less time than what solar advocates had wanted.

Those rate hikes were approved back in December, touching off a firestorm among net-metering customers who say the state has reneged on its promise to encourage renewable energy.

UNR Alums Want To Connect Students With Employers

19 hours ago
Rocio Hernandez

After noticing how difficult it was to explore Reno’s job market, two University of Nevada, Reno alums decided to come up with a solution. With support from local business leaders, they’ve launched their own online platform called Dringo. Reno Public Radio’s Rocio Hernandez reports that unlike the typical job board, Dringo includes research and project opportunities for students.

Julia Ritchey

"How many have never been to a caucus before?" asks Phyllis Westrup, caucus chair for the Washoe County Republican Party. 

Hands shoot up around the room of first-time caucus goers at the Washoe County Republican Party headquarters this week in Reno.

Caucus chair Phyllis Westrup is surprised by how few people have done this before.

"To me that's amazing... and that's the way it was on Saturday, too."

Westrup walks the group of about 50 through the process step-by-step.

Julia Ritchey

Planned Parenthood CEO Cecile Richards is stepping up her campaigning for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Our reporter Julia Ritchey talked with Richards after an event in Reno yesterday.

Planned Parenthood has just three clinics in the state of Nevada, and only one in Reno.

Richards says there's much at stake in the next election to ensure her organization can continue providing their services at these locations, including birth control, cancer screenings and abortions.

This week Nevada’s largest police group is endorsing a November ballot initiative that if approved, would require background checks in private gun sales. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has more.

About 7,000 young people have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder  in Nevada.  While there is no cure, research shows Applied Behavior Analysis can help. But in the Silver State, there are less than 300 specialists certified to provide that type of one-on–one work. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores why more of these professionals are needed.

Telling a good joke is an art form that teenager Justin Reitz is trying to master.

As many as one in four female college students in the United States are sexually assaulted. That’s according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. But many of these crimes are significantly underreported. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray sits down with University  of Nevada Reno’s new victims’ advocate to learn why crime logs don’t match up to what’s really going on.

Unitarian Universalist Association

  The pastor of a Reno church says he will continue to display the racial justice banner “Black Lives Matter” despite repeated acts of vandalism. Reno Public Radio’s Julia Ritchey reports.

The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship first put up its banner in August, spurred by the national dialogue and media coverage of high-profile police shootings of African-Americans.

A day later, the sign had been spray painted over to read “White Lives Matter,” and that was only the first incident.

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