Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump square off in the third presidential debate Wednesday night.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

Follow highlights of the debate in NPR's updating news story at

Local Writer Draws On Landmarks To Highlight Reno History

Oct 18, 2016
Marcus Lavergne/Reno Public Radio News

In tracing the City of Reno back to its beginnings, some, like local biographer Jack Harpster, would say it all began with an inn by the Truckee River and a bridge.

In his newest book, The Genesis of Reno: The History of the Riverside Hotel and the Virginia Street Bridge, he dissects the influence the two landmarks have had on Reno throughout the past and present.

A political action committee (PAC) has raised about a million dollars to support a ballot measure that would raise the sales tax in Washoe County by half-a-percent. Money from the tax hike will fund school capital projects. As Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports a pending lawsuit threatens to strike the measure off the ballot.


MedMen, a marijuana management and capital firm based in Los Angeles, broke ground on a new production and cultivation facility this month in Washoe County. Our contributor Brook Bentley of the Northern Nevada Business Weekly has the details. 

The 45,000-square-foot operation east of Sparks is opening next year and will cost $15 million. It's the firm’s first project in Nevada and is expected to produce 10,000 pounds of cannabis each year.

Image courtesy Jay Kolbet-Clausell /

The City of Reno has removed 68 benches from downtown using money from its blight fund. Officials say the project is in response to complaints of panhandling. 

Our reporter Bob Conrad has been covering this story for ThisisReno and says the reaction he's received from local advocates for the homeless has been overwhelmingly negative. It's also created some real questions.

Nevada Lawmakers Greenlight Raiders Stadium Deal

Oct 14, 2016
Alexa Ard

The Nevada Assembly approved the bill to spend $750 million in public taxpayer money on an NFL stadium on Friday afternoon. With more from NPR member station KNPR, here's Casey Morell.

The Assembly sent the measure to Governor Brian Sandoval's desk after a long day of testimony Thursday that bled into Friday morning.

Lawmakers found out late in the night nearly $900 million in infrastructure spending would be needed for roadways leading to and from the stadium, if it gets built – and that money will have to be diverted from other projects already on the table.

Anh Gray

The Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District is on the scene battling the Little Valley Fire. Reno Public Radio's Anh Gray checks in with Erin Holland who is with the agency and stationed at the command center to get an update.

The Little Valley Fire, which started around 2 a.m., is burning quickly through Washoe Valley. Officials have closed I-580 and US-395 through Washoe Valley as north as Mount Rose Highway, and are urging residents to be on standby in case of quickly changing conditions.

Public Information Officer for the Washoe County Sheriff's Office Bob Harmon says officials are working to figure out total size at this point, but as of now, there is no containment.

Alexa Ard

The Nevada State Assembly is currently in session, considering a plan for a new NFL stadium in Las Vegas that would use $750 million worth of public funds.

Steve Hill is the chairman of the Southern Nevada Tourism and Infrastructure Committee. He says the stadium project is estimated to cost $1.9 billion and if that number runs higher, the developers will be on the hook for the additional cost.

Assemblyman Ira Hansen, who represents Northern Nevada’s Assembly District 32, questions Hill about what happens if the project comes in at a lower cost.

Anh Gray

In a state of emergency, first responders and doctors are the ones on the scene to provide help. Earlier this week, the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center held a drill to train providers for a potential crisis. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has the details.

In this particular drill, the Tribal Health Center simulated a flu pandemic. Stacey Montooth with the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony says this training helps providers prepare for variety of emergencies.